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laser cutting

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005618
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract Laser has found its applications in cutting, drilling, and shock-peening operations of manufacturing industry because of its accurate, safe, and rapid cutting property. This article provides an account on the fundamental principles of laser cutting (thermal), drilling, and shock...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005106
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... Abstract Cutting with lasers is accomplished with carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers. This article provides a description of the process variables and principles of laser cutting. It discusses the three basic types of CO 2 gas lasers, namely, slow...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 15 Oxygen-assisted laser cutting showing the influence of cutting speed on cut quality. Courtesy of Air Liquide-CTAS Cutting and Welding R&D Laboratory More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Principle of laser-cutting thermal process. The laser beam is highly focused so as to input more heat per square inch than the workpiece can dissipate away by conduction, convection, or radiative heat transfer. The accumulation of heat causes the workpiece temperature to elevate More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 Comparative scale between CO 2 laser and 1 μm laser-cutting systems. (a) Comparing 3 kW disk laser cutting with the 100% baseline of a 5 kW CO 2 laser for N 2 -assisted fusion cutting of stainless steel. The disk laser yields superior speed performance up to approximately 4 mm (0.160 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Key process parameters for laser cutting. Inputs are categorized under the “6M” categories of Man, Machine, Method, Material, Measurement, and Mother Nature; outputs impact the environment, safety, quality, productivity, and profitability. See Ref 1 for a detailed discussion More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 3 Primary set-up parameters for laser cutting More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 13 Influence of oxygen assist gas purity on laser-cutting speed for CO 2 laser and fiber laser cutting of mild steel. Source: Air Liquide-CTAS Cutting and Welding R&D Laboratory More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 16 Influence of gas pressure set-up on laser-cutting performance. (a) O 2 assist gas with mild steel. (b) N 2 assist gas with stainless steel. Courtesy of Air Liquide-CTAS Cutting and Welding R&D Laboratory More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 19 (a) Features of edge quality for laser cutting. The striations observed on the cut-edge surface are indicative of a cut front line with three zones: a smoother cut area at the top, a rougher break area at the bottom, and a hanging dross area. For a high-quality cut, the break More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 21 (a) High-volume, three-dimensional (3-D) production CO 2 laser cutting of automobile steel components. Courtesy of Trumpf Inc. (b) Cutting of copper tubes with fiber laser. Courtesy of BLM Group. (c) B-pillar component illustrating guidelines for reducing speed and consequently More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 13 Variation of laser cutting parameters with focal length. S , spot size. F , depth of field More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 14 Gas-assisted laser cutting More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 16 Gas-assisted laser cutting of holes in 19 mm (0.75 in.) thick birch plywood with fixed cutting head, using trepanning technique. The nozzle, which appears to be touching the workpiece, is actually 1 mm (0.04 in.) above it. More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 16 Effect of laser cutting speed on kerf width size and its comparison with mathematically predicted values. Adapted from Ref 45 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 6 Laser-cut 13 mm (0.50 in.) holes cut through 1 mm (0.04 in.) thick aluminum-boron. Recast aluminum forms a burr on the exit (top) side of the cut. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 22 (a) Cylindrical die board being laser-cut. (b) Ready-to-ship die board with steel rule blades inserted, and gray rubber pads with pressure-sensitive adhesives to prevent cardboard from sticking to the die after the cut. (c) Examples of corrugated boxes for pizza delivery cut with die More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 5 Laser-cut 3.2 mm (0.13 in.) titanium-SiC composite in which the titanium matrix material has flowed away from the SiC fibers and formed a recast layer at the exit (top) side of the cut More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Typical laser-cut parts. (a) Ceramic. (b) Metal More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 15 Laser-cut 19 mm (0.75 in.) thick birch plywood showing internal kerf enlargement that is due to short focal length and high travel speed More