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laser beam welds

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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Joint designs for laser beam welds on wire. Arrows show direction of laser beam. (a) Butt weld. (b) Round-to-round lap weld. (c) Cross-joint weld. (d) Spot weld for T-joint. (e) Terminal or lug weld More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 10 Joint designs for laser-beam welds on wire. Arrows show direction of laser beam. (a) Butt weld. (b) Round-to-round lap weld. (c) Cross-joint weld. (d) Spot weld for T-joint. (e) Terminal or lug weld More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 8 Joint designs for laser beam welds on wire. Arrows show direction of laser beam. (a) Butt weld. (b) Round-to-round lap weld. (c) Cross-joint weld. (d) Spot weld for T-joint. (e) Terminal or lug weld More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Joint designs for laser beam welds on sheet metal. Arrows show direction of laser beam. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 9 Joint designs for laser-beam welds on sheet metal. Arrows show direction of laser beam. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 20 S / N fatigue curves for laser-beam welds in 4 mm (0.16 in.) Ti-6Al-4V sheet produced at 2 and 4 m/min (0.6 and 1.2 ft/min). Tested in as-welded condition. Fracture initiated at weld undercut. Base metal properties are provided for comparative purposes. Source: Ref 39 More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 7 Joint designs for laser beam welds on sheet metal. Arrows show direction of laser beam. Source: Ref 20 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005641
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article provides an overview of the fundamentals, mechanisms, process physics, advantages, and limitations of laser beam welding. It describes the independent and dependent process variables in view of their role in procedure development and process selection. The article includes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001370
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Laser-beam welding (LBW) uses a moving high-density coherent optical energy source, called laser, as the source of heat. This article discusses the advantages and limitations of LBW and tabulates energy consumption and efficiency of LBW relative to other selected welding processes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005631
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article describes the joint preparation, fit-up and design of various types of laser beam weld joints: butt joint, lap joint, flange joint, kissing weld, and wire joint. It explains the use of consumables for laser welding and highlights the special laser welding practices...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001445
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Laser-beam welding (LBW) is a joining process that produces coalescence of material with the heat obtained from the application of a concentrated coherent light beam impinging upon the surface to be welded. This article describes the steps that must be considered when selecting the LBW...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005627
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article provides a history of electron and laser beam welding, discusses the properties of electrons and photons used for welding, and contrasts electron and laser beam welding. It presents a comparison of the electron and laser beam welding processes. The article also illustrates...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 3 Schematic showing effect of convection on laser beam welding melt pool configuration. (a) Spherical shape with flat surface typical of low- Pr m materials. (b) Shallow and undercut free surface characteristic of high- Pr m materials. Numbers in the figure identify specific regions More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 10 Transverse profiles as a function of focus position for a laser-beam-welded type 310 stainless steel. Negative and positive numbers indicate position of the focal point below and above, respectively, the surface of the plate. Beam power, 5 kW; traverse welding speed, 16 mm/s (38 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Transverse profiles as a function of focus position for a laser-beam welded type 310 stainless steel. Negative and positive numbers indicate position of focal point below and above, respectively, surface of plate. Beam power, 5 kW. Traverse welding speed, 16 mm/s (38 in./min). Source More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 9 Microstructures of laser-beam-welded austenitic stainless steels. (a) Gas-tungsten arc weld shown on left, with CO 2 laser-beam weld shown on right, in alloy of Cr eq /Ni eq = 1.8. Laser-beam weld on right is single-phase austenite formed as a product of massive transformation. (b More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 10 Pulsed Nd:YAG laser-beam weld exhibiting severe solidification cracking as a consequence of primary austenite solidification, Cr eq /Ni eq = 1.6. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Macrograph showing columnar beta grains in a Ti-6Al-4V laser-beam weld. 13×. Courtesy of The Welding Institute More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Microstructure of CO 2 laser-beam weld on A356/SiC/15 p (unetched) More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 25 Microstructure of continuous-wave CO 2 laser beam weld on A356/SiC/15 p (unetched) More