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jigging

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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 8 Methods that can be used to make solder joints self-jigging. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 21 Self-jigging joint configurations More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 6 Jig grinder used for intricate shapes and holes with high degree of accuracy More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 50 Specimens (a) and a jig (b) for express shear strength testing of brazed joints. Source: Ref 47 More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 11 Compression testing of thin-sheet specimens. (a) Sheet compression jig suitable for room-temperature or elevated-temperature testing. (b) Contact-point compressometer installed on specimen removed from jig. Contact points fit in predrilled shallow holes in the edge of the specimen. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 8 Jig for double-notched shear test More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 12 Application of jigs to maintain flatness and to minimize distortion when welding thin sheet material More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 12 Classic six-point location system showing various degrees of sophistication, and the jig or fixture that would be used for dimensional checking or for machining. (a) Basic location system. (b) Halving of length errors. (c) Use of tooling lugs for clamping. (d) Jig or fixture attached More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 11 Standard end-quench (Jominy) test specimen and method of quenching in quenching jig More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 5 Jominy end-quench hardenability test. (a) Standard end-quench test specimen and in a quenching jig. (b) Hardness plot and cooling rate as a function of distance from the quenched end More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 11 Shear testing. (a) Drawing showing the sample sizes used. (b) Schematic of the test setup. Courtesy of M.J. Dapino, The Ohio State University. (c) Illustration of the test setup. (d) Photograph of actual test jig More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 1 (a) Laser powder-bed-fusion-printed 316L stainless steel fracture fixation plates on a build plate; (b) and (c) Fracture fixation plate shown with 3D-printed polymer jig used for screw hole alignment. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 7 Tooling for electrochemical machining deburring. (a) Valve casing. (b) A fragmentary schematic of the production jig. Machining parameters: 15% water solution of NaNO 3 ; U (in Fig. 2 ) = 15 V; machining time, 8 s; electrolyte pressure, 1 MPa; maximum current per piece, 20 A More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001397
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... of wire solder and flux is not recommended because of the rapidity of heating and the potential hazard of electrical shock. The preassembled workpieces are positioned in a grounded jig or clamp, and the movable electrode is brought in contact with the workpiece to complete the circuit. When the power...
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Published: 01 December 1998
with a chucking machine. (f) Centerless grinding. (g) Inside diameter form grinding. (h) Jig grinding. (i) Double-disk grinding. (j) Thread grinding. (k) Outside-diameter form grinding. (l) Slot grinding More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 39 Reactor used to perform gas nitriding. 1, muffle furnace; 2, outer shell; 3, heater; 4, internal container (retort); 5, gas inlet pipe; 6, exhaust pipe; 7, motor; 8, fan; 9, metal-made jig; 10, gas guide cylinder; 11, inverted funnel; 12, vacuum pump; 13, effluent gas combustion More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 3 Good and bad methods for workpiece support and clamping: (a) Clamping forces should direct the work against the points of location and work support. (b) Whenever possible, cutting forces should act against the fixed portion of a jig or fixture. (c) The points of clamping should More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fixed diode Vacuum chamber diameter, mm (in.) 610 (24) Maximum vacuum, Pa (torr) 0.00133 (1 × 10 −5 ) Fixture Holding jig Pumpdown time, min 30 Brazing power, kV; mA 18; 20–30 Beam spot size diameter, mm (in.) 4.76 ( 3 16 ) Brazing vacuum, Pa (torr) 0.00133 (1 × 10 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
× 30 × 62 in.) Maximum vacuum 13 μPa (10 −7 torr) Fixtures Assembly jig; travel carriage Welding power:  Penetration pass 30 kV at 170 mA  Cosmetic pass 19 kV at 95 mA Welding vacuum 1.3 mPa (10 −5 torr) Pumpdown time 10 min Beam focal, penetration pass At surface More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001454
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... preplaced for brazing. Preferably, the parts should be self-jigging. External jigs and fixtures can be used when absolutely necessary, but add extra capital and operating expense, because the parts have to be assembled in the jigs and the jigs themselves have a finite life. Fully enclosed parts must...