1-20 of 687 Search Results for

jet engines

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 8 Jet engine combustion chamber housing with electron beam machined holes. Courtesy of MG Industries/Steigerwald More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 4 Forged Ti-6Al-4V jet engine fan disks are 890 mm (35 in.) in diameter and weigh 249 kg (548 lb). Courtesy of Wyman-Gordon Company More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 18 Increasing section toughness of bearing materials used for jet engine applications. (a) Trend in aircraft engine main bearing in units of DN , the bearing bore diameter in millimeters multiplied by the rotation of the shaft in revolutions per minute. (b) Estimated inner race More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Trends in materials usage for the aircraft industry. (a) Jet engine material usage. Source: Titanium Development Association and General Electric Company. (b) Airframe materials usage for naval aircraft. Source: Naval Air Development Center and Naval Air Systems Command More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 28 52100 steel jet-engine ball bearing that failed because of overheating resulting from misalignment. (a) Photograph of bearing components showing fractured cage. (b) Enlarged view of cage showing damage caused by scoring, scuffing, and plastic deformation around ball pockets More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Cadmium-plated 4140 steel nuts from a military jet engine that failed by LME. (a) Fragmented and cracked nuts. (b) Typical fracture surface. (c) Electron fractograph showing brittle intergranular fracture More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Typical creep deformation and intergranular cracking in a jet-engine turbine blade. Courtesy of J. Schijve More
Image
Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 5 GE jet engine bracket. (a) Conventional bracket. Source: Ref 31 . (b) Redesigned bracket. Source: Ref 32 More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 16 Cadmium-plated 4140 steel nuts from a military jet engine that failed by liquid metal induced embrittlement. (a) Fragmented and cracked nuts. (b) Typical fracture surface. (c) Electron fractograph showing brittle intergranular failure More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 67 An AISI 52100 (100Cr6 or WN 1.3505) steel jet-engine ball bearing failed due to overheating that resulted from misalignment. (a) Bearing components showing fractured cage. (b) Enlarged view of the cage showing damage (scoring, scuffing, plastic deformation of the ball pockets More
Image