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iron-base heat-resistant casting

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003246
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract This article is a pictorial representation of commonly observed microstructures in iron-base alloys (carbon and alloy steels, cast irons, tool steels, and stainless steels) that occur as a result of variations in chemical analysis and processing. It reviews a wide range of common and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003993
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... superalloys, namely, iron-nickel superalloys, nickel-base alloys, cobalt-base alloys, and powder alloys. The article discusses the microstructural mechanisms during hot deformation and presents processing maps for various superalloys. It concludes with a discussion on heat treatment of wrought heat-resistant...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001307
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Abstract This article describes the methods for removing metallic contaminants, tarnish, and scale resulting from hot-working or heat-treating operations on nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base heat-resistant alloys. It provides a brief description of applicable finishing and coating processes...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... corrosion resistance and optimum mechanical properties are obtained in the same heat treatment. THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE STRENGTH of all superalloys is based on the principle of a stable face-centered cubic (fcc) matrix combined with either precipitation strengthening and/or solid-solution...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003111
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... cast iron alloying elements corrosion-resistant cast irons heat-resistant cast irons white cast irons ALLOY CAST IRONS are considered to be those casting alloys based on the Fe-C-Si system that contain one or more alloying elements intentionally added to enhance one or more useful properties...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003220
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... descaling of stainless steel parts, equipment, and systems, although it does not cover electropolishing. THE REMOVAL of metallic contaminants, tarnish, and scale resulting from hot-working or heat-treating operations on nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base heat-resistant alloys is described...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003810
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
..., are reviewed. The article provides information on classes of the cast irons based on corrosion resistance. It describes the various forms of corrosion in cast irons, including graphitic corrosion, fretting corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, intergranular attack, erosion-corrosion...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005257
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... process, including carbon and alloy steels, high-alloy corrosion- and heat-resistant steels, gray iron, ductile and nodular iron, high-alloy irons, stainless steels, nickel steels, aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, nickel- and cobalt-base alloys, and titanium alloys. Nonmetals can also be...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005186
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
...-resistant and heat-conductive aluminum cookware could be produced using the same patterns used to cast iron and brass pots, pans, and kettles ( Ref 7 ). Casting technology during the 20th century advanced in many ways ( Table 5 ), with “more casting progress since World War II than in the previous 3000...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005265
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... levels of oxide inclusions. Castings produced by this process are used in gas turbine engines. Thin-wall components (0.5 mm, or 0.02 in.) previously made as weldments can be produced, thus enabling design freedom for shaped castings that maximize heat transfer, ease assembly, and reduce thermal fatigue...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005258
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... heat and coat the mold before pouring the molten metal (except the cold mold method for ductile iron pipe). There must be a means to pour the molten metal safely into the rotating mold at a controlled rate, position, and orientation. Once the metal is poured, a proper solidification and cooling...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005342
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... fracture. When examining a casting that has fractured, it is important to know basic information about the part. Background data concerning the alloy type and grade, the expected mechanical properties, the overall heat treatment, and any special surface treatments or processes should be...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005318
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... influence heat flow. Materials such as tungsten-base alloys and beryllium copper with higher thermal conductivity than tool steel are used as inserts to promote higher heat flow rates in local areas. The location of waterlines is a key control of heat flow. The complex shapes of many die castings restrict...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005288
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... major supplier of such equipment In 1957, the Swiss company Alfred Wertli ( Ref 12 ) introduced the first industrial horizontal continuous caster for the production of cast iron rods and later expanded into continuous casting plants for a full range of copper-base alloys and shapes—rod, billet, and...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005260
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... chosen on the basis of the number of castings to be produced and the cost of the material and the cavity machining. As shown for aluminum casting ( Table 1 ), gray iron is usually the material of choice for low-production applications. Gray irons also offer more rapid heat-transfer properties than tool...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005307
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... for holding, are fuel-fired open-pot, immersion tube heated, or induction heated. Most pots for melting and containing molten zinc alloys are cast from gray or ductile cast iron. Ladles, if used, are of cast iron or pressed steel. Regardless of its type, the furnace should be equipped with controls so...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0009020
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... geometry is different from typical ductile iron geometry, and the molding process may need to supplement the different geometry with heat-transfer techniques. Not suspecting this, the design may suffer from no-quotes, higher-than-expected prices, or metalcaster requests for design changes. How are design...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005287
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... slower cooling. Pressure die casting came into existence in the early 1820s in response to the expanding need for large volumes of cast print type. Iron or steel dies had been used in casting print type in lead-base alloys in the 17th century. Iron molds were also used in colonial times to cast...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005261
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... options, such as expendable sand and shell cores and mechanical single- or multipiece permanent cores, are successfully used in the low-pressure process. The large majority of casting produced in low pressure are aluminum; however iron-, magnesium-, and copper-base alloys are successfully cast with this...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005259
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... that of iron and a specific heat approximately double that of iron. The chilling ability of a material is roughly equal to the product of its mass multiplied by its specific heat. Graphite is nonreactive with most molten metals. In casting phosphorus bronze, graphite molds are not burned into as iron...