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iron aluminides

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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 16 Comparison of the corrosion behavior of iron aluminides with that of conventional iron-base alloys Fe-18Cr-6Al (the coating material) and Fe-25Cr-20Ni. All materials were exposed to a severe sulfidizing environment at 800 °C (1470 °F). More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 21 Comparison of corrosion behavior of iron aluminides with that of conventional iron-base alloys Fe-18Cr-6Al (coating material) and Fe-25Cr-20Ni. All materials were exposed to a severe sulfidizing environment at 800 °C (1470 °F). Source: Ref 126 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 6 Weight change versus time for specimens cut from iron-aluminide weld overlays and isothermally exposed to H 2 S-H 2 -H 2 O-Ar at 800 °C (1470 °F). The elemental concentrations shown are in at.%; the balance is iron. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 2 Crystal structures of nickel, iron, and titanium aluminides More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 Crystal structures of nickel, iron, and titanium aluminides More
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003164
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... (Ni3Al and NiAl), iron aluminides (Fe3Al and FeAl) and titanium aluminides (alpha-2 alloys, orthorhombic alloys, and gamma alloys). alloying effects corrosion resistance crystallographic data fabrication iron aluminides mechanical properties nickel aluminides processing of aluminides...
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 52 Microstructure of aluminized low-carbon steel. (a) Type 1 aluminized (aluminum with 9% Si). (b) Type 2 aluminized steel. Both coatings have the alloy layer (iron aluminide intermetallic layer), and silicon particles can be seen in type 1 aluminized. 2% nital etch. 1000× More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001102
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... and metallurgical properties, material processing and fabrication, structural applications, mechanical behavior, environmental embrittlement, alloying effects, and crystal structure of aluminides of nickel, iron, titanium, and silicides. It describes the cleavage and intergranular fracture in trialuminides...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003837
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... or through the evolution of sulfides. Fe<sub>3</sub>Al and FeAl The iron aluminides, mainly Fe 3 Al and FeAl, are of interest for many land-based applications because of their appropriate mechanical properties, ease of fabrication, excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance, conservation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003429
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
.... The resulting brittle iron aluminide is very brittle and causes tears in the surface of the extrusions; such tearing includes hot shortness at high temperatures as well as ductility-related tearing at lower temperatures and speeds ( Ref 1 ). The use of surface lubricants and conical dies minimizes the surface...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003971
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
...-based materials ( Ref 7 ). Bulk forming on a commercial scale has been used for MMCs with aluminum-alloy and, to a lesser extent, titanium-alloy matrices. Iron-aluminide alloys based on the Fe 3 Al compound are probably the structural intermetallic materials that have been produced in the largest...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... of manufacturing methods in the context of processing-cost trade-offs for gamma titanium aluminide alloys are also discussed. Iron-, Nickel-, Niobium-, and Molybdenum-Base Intermetallic Alloys This section reviews the status of the bulk forming of some of the more common aluminide and silicide systems...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003555
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... and metal dusting, sulfidation, hot corrosion, chloridation, hydrogen interactions, molten metals, molten salts, and aging reactions including sensitization, stress-corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue. It concludes with a discussion on various protective coatings, such as aluminide coatings, overlay...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002473
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... in providing oxidation protection. Other high-temperature materials described include nickel and titanium aluminide intermetallics, refractory metals, and ceramics. Additional information on the oxidation resistance of other structural alloys, including chromia-forming ferrous alloys for industrial...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003140
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., and advanced titanium alloys (titanium-matrix composites and titanium aluminides). physical metallurgy titanium alloys application titanium aluminides titanium-matrix composites TITANIUM is a low-density element (approximately 60% of the density of iron) that can be highly strengthened...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001293
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... published in 1951 and 52 ( Ref 7 , 8 ). Aluminide coating of chromized steels to further improve high-temperature oxidation resistance was patented in 1953 ( Ref 9 ). The time of first widespread use of chromide coatings on gas turbine parts is obscure but probably occurred in Europe in the early 1960s...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001313
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... to remove them if they are ceramic. If “iron” grit is used, embedded particles may be removed with hydrochloric acid, or by the nitric-hydrofluoric acid cleaning process described later in this section. When thinner sections such as sheet or plate are subjected to abrasive blasting on one side...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... a hard compound layer, mostly applied over hardened tool steels; high process temperature can cause distortion. (a) Requires quench from austenitizing temperature In general, simple binary alloys, for example, iron-chromium and nickel-aluminum, are not as effective for oxidation resistance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004158
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of their high strength at high temperatures. Cobalt-base superalloys are typically used for vanes because of their good resistance to hot corrosion and good weldability. Iron-base superalloys are typically used for disks and lower-temperature blades, vanes, and shrouds. Stainless steels, both austenitic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001101
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
...-performance carbon, metallic, or ceramic additions. Reinforced intermetallic compounds such as the aluminides of titanium, nickel, and iron are also discussed in this article (for more information on intermetallic compounds, see the article “Ordered Intermetallics” in this Volume). Reinforcements...