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intergranular corrosion

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003664
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
...Abstract Abstract Most alloys are susceptible to intergranular corrosion, also known as intergranular attack (IGA), when exposed to specific environments. This article reviews the theory and application of acceptance tests for detecting the susceptibility of stainless steels and nickel-base...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 7 Various types of intergranular corrosion. (a) Interdendritic corrosion in a cast structure. (b) Interfragmentary corrosion in a wrought, unrecrystallized structure. (c) Intergranular corrosion in a recrystallized wrought structure. All etched with Keller's reagent. Original magnification More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 18 Average depth of intergranular corrosion penetration of zinc-aluminum alloys as a function of aluminum concentration in water vapor at 95 °C (205 °F) for ten days. Source: Ref 64 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 34 Intergranular corrosion. (a) Sample from a cast stainless steel neck fitting. (b) Region adjacent to the intergranular corrosion revealing extensive σ-phase precipitation at grain boundaries; electrolytic etching using 10 N KOH. (c) Same area as (b) after repolishing and etching More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 14 Precipitation of carbide M 23 C 6 and area of intergranular corrosion attack of stainless steel grade AISI 304 (0.042C-0.59Si-1.23Mn-17.46Cr-10.58Ni-0.046N). Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 13 Intergranular corrosion of a contaminated E-Brite stainless steel weld. Electrolytically etched with 10% oxalic acid. 200×. Source: Ref 47 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 14 Intergranular corrosion of the inside surface HAZ of E-Brite stainless steel adjacent to the weld fusion line. Electrolytically etched with 10% oxalic acid. 100×. Source: Ref 47 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Intergranular corrosion (weld decay) of stainless steel weldments. FZ, fusion zone More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 39 An example of severe intergranular attack/intergranular stress-corrosion cracking at a tube support location. See the article “Corrosion in Pressurized Water Reactors” in this Volume. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 31 Intergranular cracking typical of polythionic acid stress-corrosion cracking in type 304 (S30400) stainless steel. 75× More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 Intergranular high-pH stress-corrosion crack in line pipe steel. Nital etchant. Original magnification: 400× More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Typical stress-corrosion cracking in a copper alloy. Intergranular cracking in Cu-27.5Zn-1.0Sn alloy tube, probably caused by mercury or ammonia. Specimen was etched in 50 mL HNO 3 , 0.5 g AgHNO 3 , and 50 mL H 2 O. Original magnification approximately 100× More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 18 Stress-corrosion cracking by intergranular decohesion of cold-worked 316 stainless steel at high stress intensity in boiling magnesium chloride More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 20 SEM image of pitting corrosion and intergranular fracture on a pair of 17-4 precipitation-hardening H 900 surgical scissors that fractured due to corrosion-induced hydrogen embrittlement More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16 Longitudinal crack and intergranular stress-corrosion cracks in copper air-conditioning absorber tubes. (a) Longitudinal crack in one of the absorber tubes. Original magnification: 0.75×. (b) Macrograph of fine, irregular crack on the outer surface of the second absorber tube after light More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 23 Corrosion fatigue of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested in ambient air. Intergranular cracking and fatigue striations are evident on the fracture surface; the grain appears to have separated from the rest of the microstructure. Source: Ref 21 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 46 Theoretical and observed intergranular stress corrosion crackdepth vs. operational-time relationships for 28 in. diameter schedule 80 type 304 stainless steel piping for two boiling-water reactors operating at different mean coolant conductivities. Note the bracketing of the maximum crack More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003617
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... and processing variables on the susceptibility of the stainless steels to intergranular corrosion and intergranular stress-corrosion cracking and their testing methods. It explains the effect of sigma and related phases on the corrosion behavior of stainless steels. carbon distribution nitrogen metallic...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003548
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, intergranular corrosion, and velocity-affected corrosion. The article contains a table that lists combinations of alloys and environments subjected to selective leaching and the elements removed by leaching. corrosion crevice corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003702
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
...Abstract Abstract This article outlines the processes by which materials are selected to prevent or control localized corrosion, galvanic corrosion, and intergranular corrosion. It reviews the operating conditions and the design of candidate materials for material selection. The article...