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inelastic strain

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003400
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract One of the key attributes of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites (CFCCs) is their ability to undergo inelastic straining upon mechanical loading. This article reviews the mechanics of inelastic deformation and fracture of CFCCs, as needed for the development of damage...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002418
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... a schematic illustration of a basic cell model to characterize the inelastic strains that occur in ceramic-matrix composites and their dependence on the interface friction. anisotropic grain bridging ceramic-matrix composites density ductility elastic modulus inelastic strain interface friction...
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 9 Stress-strain response obtained using a ramp-shaped pulse in a modified split-Hopkinson pressure bar test for zirconia ceramic exhibiting inelastic strains associated with stress-induced transformation and microcracking. Source: Ref 9 , 10 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 24 Cyclic hardening of annealed type 304 stainless steel: Effective peak stress versus accumulated inelastic strain for pure axial and torsional cycling and intermittent axial/torsion cycling at an effective strain amplitude of 0.008. Source: Ref 51 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
in 90° out-of-phase cycling (three amplitudes) versus accumulated inelastic strain. The effective strain rate is 3 × 10 −4 1/s in all cyclic tests. Source: Ref 51 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 11 Basic cell model (hysteresis loops) used to characterize the inelastic strains that occur in ceramic-matrix composites and their dependence on the interface friction. ε = u / d , f = R / b . More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002469
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
...-strain hysteresis loop develops during cyclic loading lead to low-cycle fatigue failure, usually in less than 100,000 cycles. Cyclic inelastic deformation causes dissipation of energy, which can lead to significant self-heating of a specimen if a high frequency is used for testing. This is one reason why...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002391
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... where the inelastic strain range in the cycle exceeds the elastic strain range and (2) where the inelastic strains are of sufficient magnitude that they are spread uniformly over the microstructure. Fatigue damage at high temperatures develops as a result of this inelastic deformation where the strains...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.9781627081931
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0005723
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... strain at stress DCCW diamond counterclockwise dO" stress range. or alternating component concentration DCW diamond clockwise of cr Ee elastic strain e nominal strain measured remotely from Eel elastic strain dcr stress range stress concentration Ein inelastic strain dcr/2 stress amplitude Em mean strain...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003314
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... linearly elastic, the elastically calculated stress or strain is presumed to be a controlled constant. However, should a small amount of inelasticity occur at the peak stress of the cycle, the maximum stress will drop due to stress redistribution. This action results in neither a constant pure stress nor...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003299
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
..., caution should be exercised while adopting this linear elastic approach on ceramics that exhibit significant inelastic strain before fracture. For example, zirconia ceramics, such as MgO-PSZ and Y-TZP, exhibit considerable inelastic strains due to stress-induced transformation and associated microcracking...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005238
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... interacting physical phenomena are involved in stress-strain formation. Stress arises primarily from the mismatch of strains caused by large temperature gradients and depends on the time- and microstructure-dependent inelastic flow of the material. Predicting distortions and residual stresses in cast...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006331
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... represents the real, measurable deformation of the material. At any time, it corresponds to the sum of the three quantities on the right side: the elastic strain, ε el ; the thermal strain, ε th ; and the inelastic strain, ε in . From a physical standpoint, the first one is associated with the recoverable...
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12 Discrete dislocations and a continuum field of the inelastic (plastic) strain field (dotted and shadowed regions) that yields the same plastic deformation at a coarse-grained length scale (much greater than dislocation core size). (Model output images are in color.) More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 11 Effects of inelasticity and notch shape on the stress concentration factors in a class II CFCC. The finite-element results are based on the GH constitutive law, assuming bilinear stress–strain behavior with the parameters shown in the inset of Fig. 8(a) . Also shown for comparison More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006781
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... is the absolute temperature. Figure 2 provides insight into the effect of temperature on inelastic deformation accumulation. The images are of the external surface of nickel-base superalloy test specimens. Both specimens were monotonically tested to an identical inelastic strain. One specimen was tested at room...
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 8 Inelastic zones around a crack tip under SSY yielding conditions for (a) class II and (b) class III materials. The coordinates x and y are measured horizontally and vertically, respectively, from the crack tip, and the stresses are applied remotely along the y -direction More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003302
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... operation, material removal occurs in less than several hundred microseconds, resulting in a strain rate in excess of 10 3 /s. This strain rate is at least 5 to 6 orders of magnitude greater than that achieved in a static indentation test. At such high strain rates, it is well established that the inelastic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005420
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... be predicted from the results of a transient thermal-stress analysis of the mold itself, by combining the calculated inelastic strain (due to plasticity and creep) with measurements of cycles to failure from thermal-fatigue experiments. For example, surface cracks in copper molds used from continuous casting...