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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005841
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract Inductors used for brazing can be machined from solid copper shapes or fabricated out of copper tubing, depending on the size and complexity of the braze joint geometry to be heated. This article provides information on inductors (coils) that are generally classified as solenoid...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005839
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... current on the induction coil and process design, and the control of heating in different areas of the inductor part. The article reviews three main tools for adjustment of coil design and fabrication: coupling gap, coil copper profile, and magnetic flux controllers. It examines the method of holding...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 13 Examples of gap-by-gap inductors. Courtesy of Inductoheat, Inc. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 12 Mechanical aspects of the induction machine using oval solenoid inductors relate to bars entering, transporting through the induction coil, and exiting. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 15 Losses in 2000 kW inductors for copper alloys of different models. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 22 Several examples of hairpin-type inductors for static hardening of localized areas (quench devices are not shown). Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 24 A family of inductors that belong to the group of solenoid coils. (a) Multiturn and single-turn coils for single-place heating. (b) Single-turn for multiplace heating. (c) Multiturn for multiplace heating. (d) Round multiturn. (e) Rectangular multiturn. (f) Formed multiturn. (g More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 5 Clamshell or split inductors were developed and extensively used for induction hardening of crankshafts in the 1940s. Source: Ref 1 , 9 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 8 (a) Non-encircling U-shaped inductors. (b) Close-up view of carbide guides that ride on the journal. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 9 Rotational-type crankshaft hardening machine with U-shaped inductors. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 4 Machined inductors made from solid copper bar indicating fabrication and water-cooling arrangements. (a) Single turn. (b) Two station. (c) Four station with internal cooling. (d) Four station with external cooling. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 5 Magnetic fields and heating patterns produced by various inductors. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 3 The majority of factors related to premature failures of inductors can be categorized into these four groups. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 14 In some applications, inductors are exposed to hostile working environments. This includes repeatable heating and cooling; the presence of smoke, steam, special atmospheres, and quench fluid; etc. Courtesy of Inductoheat Inc. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 35 Examples of gap-by-gap inductors used for tooth-by-tooth gear hardening. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 38 These clamshell or split inductors feature integrated quench. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 46 Variety of inductors for heating internal surfaces. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 51 Split-return inductors for use in pipe seam annealing (top) and selective-hardening (bottom) applications. Source: Ref 36 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 68 Computerized-numerical-control-machined inductors More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 37 Pure copper inductors produced by (a) electron beam powder-bed fusion (courtesy of GH Inductor Group) and (b) laser powder-bed fusion using frequency-doubled neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers at the ~515 nm wavelength (courtesy of Trumpf) More