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in vivo assessment

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005678
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... simulators and knee joint simulators, to evaluate the performance of engineering tribological components in machine simulators. The article concludes with a section on the in vivo assessment of total joint replacement performance. ceramics friction hip joint simulators in vivo assessment knee joint...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005682
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... responses to the biomaterial. It discusses the testing methods of implant failure, such as in vitro and in vivo assessment of tissue compatibility. biomaterials biomedical devices cardiovascular applications ceramic implants dental applications functionally-graded hip implant implant failure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005655
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... 58 , 59 ). Effective in vitro testing should reduce the extent of in vivo testing required for a bioceramic. There is considerable pressure on scientists to reduce experiments on animals ( Ref 55 ). Ideally, scientists should be able to assess the biocompatibility of materials without having...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005667
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... or due to chemicals leaching out, toxicity to surrounding cells (cytotoxicity), narrowing of blood vessels (restenosis), or blood clotting on contact (thrombosis). To assess these parameters, the screening tests consist of chemical, in vitro (in glass) and in vivo (in life) experiments...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006861
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... the in vitro cytocompatibility and in vivo biocompatibility of both binder-jetted and direct-inkjetted scaffolds for biomedical applications. Finally, it discusses the challenges and troubleshooting methodologies in 3D inkjetting of biomaterials. biomaterials biomedical applications in vitro...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006908
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
..., printing characteristics and parameters as well as postprinting validation; removal of the many manufacturing material residues and sterilization; physical, chemical, and mechanical assessments of the final devices; and biological considerations of all the final devices including biocompatibility...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006889
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... Abstract This article discusses some of the additive manufacturing (AM) based fabrication of alloys and their respective mechanical, electrochemical, and in vivo performance. Firstly, it briefly discusses the three AM techniques that are most commonly used in the fabrication of metallic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005666
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... of particles facilitate a more accurate assessment of how much of an implant weight loss is due to small and large particles. Traditionally, particle-sizing techniques such as scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (number-based counting methods) provide a measure of average particle...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005654
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article describes mechanical/electrochemical phenomena related to in vivo degradation of metals used for biomedical applications. It discusses the properties and failure of these materials as they relate to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion fatigue (CF). The article...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005686
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... describes infrared (IR) and thermal analyses that are used extensively to fingerprint polymeric materials. It also presents a discussion on the chemical characterization and risk assessment of extracts. Background information on risk assessments of extracts is also included. The four basic steps...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005665
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article describes the corrosion resistance and ion release from main transition metallic bearings used as medical devices. It discusses the main issues associated with the in vivo presence of ions and their biocompatibility during the exposure of patients to different aspects...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004208
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... cracking (SCC). It discusses some of the mechanical and electrochemical phenomena related to the in vivo degradation of materials used for biomedical applications. These materials include stainless steels, cobalt and titanium-base alloy systems, and dental amalgam. The article addresses key issues related...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006905
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
..., but the consideration of affinity in vivo derived from the structure is also important. It is essential that the bone/implant interface be functionally fused and connected by bone with sound anisotropy to behave as a functional material. The body fluid/cell invasion into the porous structure and the cell adhesion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006811
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... of a failure analysis. Patient Factors Because no two humans are exactly alike, neither are the myriad demands placed on medical devices. Each patient can bring unique factors to the conditions experienced by medical devices, both during the implantation procedure itself and in vivo. In the case...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006890
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... robot that uses interchangeable BioAssemblyTools to bioprint, move materials, pipette, and perform other tasks. Courtesy of Advanced Solutions Life Sciences, LLC. Source: Ref 19 . (c) Laser-assisted bioprinting setup based on a 5-DoF robotic positioner in vivo application for the reconstruction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005683
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... from human patients. Some of the corrosion measurements can be performed on specimens implanted in living tissues ( in vivo ) of animals, but the purpose is usually research rather than corrosion performance evaluation. An important feature of the corrosion behavior of most metallic implant materials...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005657
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
..., in vivo loading conditions, and device misuse. Large-scale device failures, such as the Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valve issues experienced in the 1980s and 1990s ( Ref 2 , Ref 3 , Ref 4 ), have helped shape governmental regulations and the entire medical device industry. Medical device...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006860
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... Abstract The use of 3D bioprinting techniques has contributed to the development of novel cellular patterns and constructs in vitro, ex vivo, and even in vivo. There are three main bioprinting techniques: inkjet printing, extrusion printing (also known as bioextrusion), laser-induced forward...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006886
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
..., compressive strength, and elastic modulus, respectively. Furthermore, excellent biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo was reported; the specimens induced osteogenic response, too. Selective Laser Sintering of Polymer Composites—Hydroxyapatite as a Reinforcing Agent/Bioactive Filler...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005669
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... resulted in the substitution of molybdenum for tungsten in the 1930s. This change also proved beneficial for improving corrosion resistance in Cl − -containing environments such as occur in vivo , making practical the use of cobalt loys for long-term (permanent) in vivo placement. Implants made...