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implant materials

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005682
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article outlines the selection criteria for choosing an implant material for biomedical devices in orthopedic, dental, soft-tissue, and cardiovascular applications. It details the development of various implants, such as metallic, ceramic, and polymeric implants. The article...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005659
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
.... biocompatibility ceramics medical implants metals nonresorbable polymers polymers resorbable polymers ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene IDEALLY, THE DESIGN AND MATERIALS of which an implant is fabricated should accomplish the defined clinical objective. The local tissue response should produce...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005656
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... implant materials orthopedic surgery plasma spray porous coatings titanium-base foams trabecular metal THE ADVENT of porous coatings for joint replacement prostheses has proven to be a remarkable innovation in the field of orthopaedics. These coatings allow for biologic fixation of implants...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005660
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
.... A discussion on natural materials, nanomaterials, and stem cells is also provided. The article concludes with examples of biomaterials applications, such as endovascular devices, knee implants, and neurostimulation. biocompatibility biomaterials cardiac pacemakers cardiovascular applications ceramics...
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 1 Relative rates of bioreactivity for ceramic implant materials. A, 45S5 Bioglass; B, KGS Ceravital (46SiO 2 -5Na 2 O-33CaO-16Ca(PO 3 ) 2 ); C, 55S4.3 Bioglass (55SiO 2 -19.5Na 2 -19.5CaO-6P 2 O 5 ); D, Cerabone A-W glass ceramic (GC); E, hydroxylapatite (HA); F, KGX Ceravital; G, Al 2 O More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 21 Fatigue curves of type 316LR stainless steel implant material tested in bending mode. (a) S-N curves for stainless steel in cold-worked and soft condition that was tested in air and aerated lactated Ringer's solution. (b) Fatigue curve for number of cycles to failure as shown in Fig More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 5 Steps showing biointegration of an implant material. Source: Ref 56 More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 1 Implant debris from two types of materials. The metal (cobalt alloy) is more rounded versus the polymeric (ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, or UHMWPE) debris, which is more elongated in shape. Metal debris can be produced at modular connections of implants, at articulating More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001819
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article commences with a description of the prosthetic devices and implants used for internal fixation. It describes the complications related to implants and provides a list of major standards for orthopedic implant materials. The article illustrates the body environment and its...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004205
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... and particulate materials to corrosion. The effect of metal ions from an implanted device on the human body is also discussed. The article concludes with information on the possible cancer-causing effects of metallic biomaterials. biocompatibility corrosion metallic biomaterials metal ions...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006853
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... Abstract One of the most frequently cited advantages of ceramics in dentistry relates to aesthetics, and the same applies for dental implants. Zirconia has emerged as the material of choice for nonmetal implants. This article introduces the reader to zirconia as an implant material, its...
Book Chapter

By Matthew Donachie
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003168
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... applications of metallic biomaterials. A table compares the mechanical properties of some common implant materials with those of bone. The article also provides information on coatings, ceramics, polymers, composites, cements, and adhesives, especially where they interact with metallic materials. basic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
..., namely, total disc replacement in the spine, dental implants, and temporomandibular joint. It describes the various testing methods for characterizing the implant materials used in hip, knee, spine, and dental applications. The article also describes the typical standards used for testing wear behavior...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005675
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... crystalline ceramics, porous ceramics, calcium phosphate ceramics, and bioactive glasses. The article discusses the compositions of ceramics and carbon-base implant materials, and examines their differences in processing and structure. It describes the chemical and microstructural basis for their differences...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005683
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract The interaction of an implant with the human body environment may result in degradation of the implant, called corrosion. This article discusses the corrosion testing of metallic implants and implant materials. The corrosion environments for medical implants are the extracellular human...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006908
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... and Manufacturing Considerations of 3D-Printed, Commercially Pure Titanium and Titanium Alloy-Based Orthopedic Implants" and "Device Testing Considerations Following FDA Guidance" for additive-manufactured medical devices. These are further subdivided into five major focus areas: materials; design, printing...
Image
Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 3 Wear volume loss as a function of cycles for untreated and nitrogen-implanted Ti-6Al-4V, showing greater than two orders of magnitude reduction in volume loss for nitrogen-implanted material. Pin, 5 mm (0.2 in.) ruby ball; load, 2.61 N (0.6 lbf); velocity, 5.65 mm/s (2.2 in./s). Source More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 6 Six-station reciprocating pin-on-plate friction and wear machine used to evaluate prosthetic implant materials More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 6 Specific yield strengths of titanium alloys compared with other metallic implant materials. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 4 Percentage increase in hardness with depth into material for N + implanted Ti-6Al-4V. Source: Ref 6 More