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hysteresis loops

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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 2 Hysteresis loops and differential magnetic permeabilities as a function of magnetic field for (1) the core (non-heat-treated steels with 0.4% C material), (2) the case (same steel after induction heat treatment), and (3) a double-layer specimen consisting of both materials More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 9 Half hysteresis loops and dc magnetization curves for grain-oriented M-6 and cold-rolled nonoriented M-19 steels. Steel thickness is 0.36 mm (0.014 in.). More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 28 Schematic hysteresis loops encountered in isothermal creep-fatigue testing. (a) Pure fatigue, no creep. (b) Tensile stress hold, strain limited. (c) Compressive stress hold, strain limited. (d) Tensile and compressive stress hold, strain limited. (e) Tensile strain hold, stress More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 5 Hysteresis loops after various numbers of fatigue cycles in both high impact polystyrene (HIPS) (bottom) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) (top). Note the lack of symmetry in the HIPS due to crazing mechanisms. See text for discussion. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 4 Hysteresis loops for several loading-unloading cycles for a PC/PBT blend. D, specimen displacement; HR, ratio of hysteresis energy to total strain energy. Source: Ref 37 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 20 Example of (a) stable cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loops and (b) hysteresis loop depicted as the sum of elastic and plastic strain components. Adapted from Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 15 Hysteresis loops for copper with varying degree of prior cold work. Source: Ref 33 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 21 Hysteresis loops of the flux-controlled magnetic circuit for plain low-carbon steel (AISI 1018) and a high-strength, low-alloy structural steel (HY-80) plate. Measurements were taken at pole flux density of 100 mT at 30 Hz excitation frequency. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 27 Hysteresis loops with changes of ε ˙ pl , obtained on high-purity polycrystalline α-Fe. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 11 Basic cell model (hysteresis loops) used to characterize the inelastic strains that occur in ceramic-matrix composites and their dependence on the interface friction. ε = u / d , f = R / b . More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 13 Hysteresis loops after various numbers of fatigue cycles in both (a) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and (b) high-impact polystyrene (HIPS). Note the lack of symmetry in the HIPS due to crazing mechanisms that require tensile component stress. More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 4 Hysteresis loops after various cycles in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene tested at stress amplitude (σ a ) = 25.4 MPa (3.68 ksi) and in high-impact polystyrene tested at σ a = 11.6 MPa (1.68 ksi) More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 9 Typical magnetic hysteresis loop of ferromagnetic materials More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 9 Hysteresis loop for magnetic materials. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 1 Major hysteresis loop for a permanent magnet material. B i (sat) is the saturation induction More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 9 Stress-strain hysteresis loop. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 (a) Magnetization curve and (b) hysteresis loop. Source: Ref 1 , 2 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 16 Major hysteresis loop for a permanent magnet material More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 34 Schematic bithermal hysteresis loop (out-of-phase cycle) Strain Type of strain Temperature Action AB Elastic + plastic Low Rapid straining BC Elastic unloading Low Rapid straining CD Thermal expansion Low-high Zero stress DE Elastic + plastic High More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 6 Example of the Bauschinger effect and hysteresis loop in tension-compression-tension loading. This example shows initial tension loading to 1% strain, followed by compression loading to 1% strain, and then a second tension loading to 1% strain. More