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hydrochloric acid

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004181
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract Hydrochloric acid (HCl) may contain traces of impurities that will change the aggressiveness of the solution. This article discusses the effects of impurities such as fluorides, ferric salts, cupric salts, chlorine, and organic solvents, in HCl. It describes the corrosion resistance...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Hydrochloric acid isocorrosion diagram of 0.1 mm/yr (4 mils/yr) comparing common stainless steels. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 11 Hydrochloric acid isocorrosion diagram of 0.13 mm/yr (5 mils/yr) comparing tantalum, zirconium, niobium, high-silicon steel, and alloy B-2. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Isocorrosion diagram for Ultimet alloy (UNS R31233) in hydrochloric acid More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Isocorrosion diagram for B-3 alloy in hydrochloric acid More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 2 Isocorrosion diagram for alloy 625 in hydrochloric acid More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Isocorrosion diagram for C-2000 alloy in hydrochloric acid More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 17 Isocorrosion diagram of Zr702 in hydrochloric acid More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 18 Anodic polarization curves for Zr702 in hydrochloric acid at near-boiling temperature. Applied potential is given in volts versus the saturated calomel electrode (SCE) More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Isocorrosion curves of niobium alloys in hydrochloric acid, 0.05 mm/yr (2 mils/yr) lines More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 2 Iron and zinc in hydrochloric acid. (a) Corrosion of zinc and iron in hydrochloric acid. (b) Cathodic protection of iron by zinc in hydrochloric acid More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001229
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Abstract Pickling is the most common of several processes used to remove scale from steel surfaces. This article provides a discussion on pickling solutions, such as sulfuric and hydrochloric acid, and describes the role of inhibitors in acid pickling. It discusses the equipment and processes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003821
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
.... The corrosive media include: hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrobromic acid, nitric acid, organic acids, salts, seawater, and alkalis. The modes of high-temperature corrosion include oxidation, carburization, metal dusting, sulfidation, nitridation, corrosion by halogens...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004186
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract Phosphoric acid is less corrosive than sulfuric and hydrochloric acids. This article discusses the corrosion rates of metal alloys in phosphoric acid, including aluminum, carbon steel and cast irons, stainless steels, nickel-rich G-type alloys, copper and copper alloys, nickel alloys...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... material incompatibilities in a table. The article summarizes the uses of chemical cleaning solutions, including hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, and sulfamic acid, as well as the additives used to neutralize their impact on corrosion. It discusses the chemical cleaning procedures, including selection...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003826
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... of hafnium in specific media, namely, water, steam, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, alkalis, organics, molten metals, and gases. Forms of corrosion, namely, galvanic corrosion, crevice corrosion, and pitting corrosion are included. The article explains the corrosion of hafnium alloys...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 12 Microstructure of type 430 ferrite stainless steel. (a) Base metal, 25 mm (1 in.) thick plate, as hot rolled; specimen from longitudinal direction. Ferrite matrix contains elongated layers of martensite and transformation products. Picral and hydrochloric acid etch, 100├Ś. (b) Weld heat More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 17 Useful life of plain and alloyed cast irons in acid alkaline media as a function of temperature and concentration of the corrodents. (a) Sulfuric acid. (b) Nitric acid. (c) Hydrochloric acid. (d) Sodium hydroxide More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 2 Useful life of plain and alloyed cast irons in acid alkaline media as a function of temperature and concentration of the corrodents. (a) Sulfuric acid. (b) Nitric acid. (c) Hydrochloric acid. (d) Sodium hydroxide More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 58 Useful life of plain and alloyed cast irons in acid alkaline media as a function of temperature and concentration of the corrodents. (a) Sulfuric acid. (b) Nitric acid. (c) Hydrochloric acid. (d) Sodium hydroxide More