1-20 of 83 Search Results for

hydride decomposition

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006087
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... such as precipitation from salt solution and gas, chemical embrittlement, hydride decomposition, and thermite reactions are also discussed. The article also discusses the methods used to produce powders electrolytically and the types of metal powders produced. The physical and chemical characteristics of these powders...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006121
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... (930 to 1290 °F) range by decomposition in air. The other oxides require the conversion to occur at higher temperatures and in reducing atmospheres (e.g., hydrogen) ( Ref 1 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 ). Tungsten oxides may be doped with various additives prior to reduction to increase electron...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003828
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... of hydride corrosion of uranium are discussed. The article provides information on environmentally assisted cracking, protective coatings, and surface modification of uranium and its alloys. It also summarizes the environmental, safety, and health considerations for their use. atmospheric corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003779
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... essentially an all-alpha microstructure. Beta alloys are those alloys from which a small volume of material can be quenched into ice water from above its beta transus without martensitic decomposition of the beta phase. Alpha-beta alloys contain a mixture of alpha and beta phases at room temperature. Within...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006045
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... and sinter approach and without any additional processing operations ( Fig. 2 ). The advantages of titanium hydride powder are twofold: refinement of brittle hydride particles by compacting forces upon consolidation, and phase decomposition of the hydride into titanium upon heating in vacuum. As a result...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006661
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... challenging because the surface compounds decomposed or reacted before the reaction products could desorb from the surface. Activation energies of the reactions or decompositions were greater than the activation energies of desorption; that is, the β-hydride elimination reaction energy is greater than...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001747
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... circuit. The copper alloy electrodes are water cooled to prevent their decomposition. The heat of the graphite crucible is directly transferred to the sample. The sample fuses to a molten state, causing the gases that had been absorbed into more stable metal/gas compounds in the sample to desorb...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001284
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... the techniques of MBE or MOCVD, where the transport of source materials, rather than substrates, is controlled. MOCVD Process The MOCVD process uses at least one metal-organic chemical as a deposition precursor. The growth of Group III-V compounds from metal-organic and hydride sources was first reported...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003823
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... zirconium alloys hydride cracking ZIRCONIUM was identified by the German chemist Martin Heinrich Klaproth in 1789. It took another 135 years for Anton E. van Arkel and J.H. de Boer, of Einhoven, Holland, to develop the iodide decomposition process to make a pure, ductile metal. The iodide crystal bar...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001730
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... Nitrous oxide-acetylene flame 3000 0.1–2 5 1.7 × 10 6 8.5 × 10 6 Graphite furnace 300–3000 0.001–0.05 2.5 0.02 0.05 Quartz tube (hydride generator) 800–1400 1–40 15 0.007 0.1 (a) Dilution factor ( Df ) assumptions: Flames—20 L/min of fuel/oxidant, 7 mL/min sample aspiration...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006495
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... of the metal or alloy. Various foaming agents have been shown to yield good results for the metals in consideration (aluminum, zinc, lead) ( Ref 34 ). Among the foaming agents used are metal hydrides such as titanium, zirconium, and magnesium hydride, which have decomposition temperatures between 280 and 600...
Book Chapter

By David V. Neff
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... or lubricant decomposition. In actual practice, it is therefore best to degas the melt to an acceptable level before casting. A typical target value, below which hydrogen-caused porosity is not normally a problem in the final casting, is that the degassing process should achieve a level of 0.15 mL H 2 /100 g...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006124
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... sintering at temperatures between 2500 and 3000 °C (4530 and 5430 °F) is essential for densification and the removal of oxygen from the pores ( Ref 12 ). Decomposition of the potassium silicate particles, combined with the removal of aluminum and silicon, occurs mainly at the second stage of sintering while...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006122
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... decomposition into pure nickel pellet or powder. To produce powder, the nickel carbonyl gas is injected at a metered rate into the top of decomposer towers. The walls of the towers are heated to 300 to 500 °C (572 to 932 °F). The gas decomposes instantly to form nickel powder which settles at the bottom...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006093
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... that matches the melting point of the metal or alloy. Various foaming agents have been shown to yield good results for the metals under consideration (aluminum, zinc, lead) ( Ref 28 ). Among the foaming agents used are metal hydrides such as titanium, zirconium, and magnesium hydride, which have decomposition...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001283
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... in a sequential fashion without breaking the vacuum (thus minimizing contamination), and the distinction between the two basic processes becomes blurred ( Ref 3 ). CVD Reactions The numerous chemical reactions used in CVD include thermal decomposition (pyrolysis), reduction, hydrolysis, disproportionation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001313
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
.../L (5 oz/gal) H 2 SO 4 at room temperature for 2 to 5 min with a current density of 5 to 10 A/dm 2 (50 to 100 A/ft 2 ). Another process intended to produce a hydride film as a basis for nickel plating is as follows: Tungsten is treated cathodically at 1 to 11 A/dm 2 (10 to 110 A/ft 2...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001463
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... is a controlling mechanism. This behavior was observed for the hyperbaric SMAW process at depths equivalent to 300 m (990 ft). The carbon monoxide is a product of the decomposition of the calcium or magnesium carbonate that exists in the SMAW electrode coating to provide a working and protective welding plasma...
Book Chapter

By Erhard Klar
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003185
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... metallurgy processed. Source: Ref 5 Chemical Processes After atomization, next in importance are chemical processes of powder production for P/M uses. These include reduction of oxides, precipitation from solution or from a gas, thermal decomposition, chemical embrittlement, hydride decomposition...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006283
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... subsequent age-hardened strength and hardness. Extremely slow cooling is detrimental, due to diffused α phase affecting the amount of available β phase for decomposition into α phase, because the precipitated α will be quite coarse, which limits the hardenability. Slow cooling is possible for α alloys...