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hot torsion testing

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009012
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... Abstract This article summarizes the types of hot working simulation tests such as hot tension, compression, and torsion testing used in the assessment of workability. It illustrates the use of hot torsion testing for the optimization of hot working processes. The article concludes...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 52 Ductility determined in hot torsion test. Source: Ref 66 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Ductility determined in hot torsion tests. AISI, American Iron and Steel Institute. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 36 Ductility determined in hot torsion tests. Source: Ref 112 , Ref 113 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 46 Comparison of optimal ductility temperature determined in hot torsion tests at ∼0.5 s −1 with operating temperatures for piercing, rolling, and forging of carbon steels. Dashed curve is for torsion; closed circles, Mannesmann tube mill; open circles, Stiefel tube mill; closed More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Ductility of two AISI carbon and alloy steels determined in hot torsion tests. Arrows denote suitable hot-working temperatures. More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 Ductility of two AISI carbon and alloy steels determined in hot torsion tests. Arrows denote suitable hot-working temperatures. More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 39 Relation between manganese sulfide content and ductility in hot torsion tests on a variety of rimmed steels. Source: Ref 31 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 6 Strain and direction dependence of the size of cavities developed during hot torsion testing of Ti-6Al-4V with a colony-alpha microstructure at 815 °C and a surface effective strain rate of 0.04 s −1 . Source: Ref 41 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 59 Micrographs of type 304L stainless hot torsion specimens tested under various strain-rate/temperature conditions. (a) 0.01 s −1 , 800 °C (1470 °F) ( ε ¯ = 1.99 ). (b) 10 s −1 , 800 °C (1470 °F)( ε ¯ = 3.81 ). (c) 0.01 s −1 , 1000 °C (1830 °F)( ε ¯ = 3.73 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009011
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... and barreling, respectively. By contrast, strains in excess of 0.3 to 0.7, the levels typical of these uniaxial tests, are readily achieved in the torsion test. The torsion test has been used for some 50 years as a means of hot workability assessment in metals and alloys ( Ref 1 , Ref 2 , Ref 3 , Ref 4...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
...-strain-rate, hot tension test conditions to establish the range of hot working temperatures. A description of this test method can be found in the article “Hot-Tension Testing.” Torsion Test In the torsion test, deformation is caused by pure shear, and large strains can be achieved without...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001032
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... to failure. Figure 3 shows the relative hot workability of two AISI carbon and alloy steels as indicated by the torsion test. The test identifies the optimal hot-working temperature for each of the two steels. The section “Evaluating Forgeability” in this article contains information on the use...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004017
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... alloy. Left, undeformed compression specimen; center, compression with friction (note barreling and crack); right, compression without friction. Source: Ref 4 Extensive finite-element modeling of the hot compression test using realistic parameters for hot-worked alloys showed that an observed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005508
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... Abstract This article describes the most commonly used test methods for determining flow stress in metal-forming processes. The methods include tension, ring, uniform compression, plane-strain compression, torsion, split-Hopkinson bar, and indentation tests. The article discusses the effect...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005864
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... used to look at the relationship of effective and total case depth. The effect of core hardness was also looked at by using shafts made from hot rolled steel, cold-drawn steel, and quenched and tempered steel. Fig. 4 Smooth test shaft Results of the static torsional testing are shown...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 16 Torsional strength versus carbon content for induction-hardened test shafts made from hot rolled steel. Smooth test shafts with heavy case depth (9.53 mm, or 0.375 in., total) More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 26 Flow curves from type 304L stainless steel torsion tests. (a) Cold and warm working temperatures. (b) Hot working temperatures. Source: Ref 88 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 50 Comparison of experimental and theoretical torque-twist curves for β (Widmanstätten alpha) microstructure Ti-6242Si hot torsion specimens. Tested at ε ¯ ˙ = 0.9   s − 1 ; T = 816 °C (1500 °F). Source: Ref 52 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 57 Stress-strain curves derived from hot torsion data for nickel at an effective strain rate of 0.016 s −1 . The dependence of flow behavior on test temperature in a material that undergoes dynamic recrystallization is shown. Source: Ref 26 More