1-20 of 384 Search Results for

hot gas soldering

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001399
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...Abstract Abstract Hot gas soldering is a process that is commonly used in applications where the workpiece thermal mass is small and the melting temperature of the solder is relatively low. This article describes the characteristics of hot gas heating that are critical to its effectiveness...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001346
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., electrodeposition, or chemical displacement. Hot Dipping Hot dipping can be accomplished by fluxing and dipping the parts in molten tin or solder. Often, small parts are initially placed in wire baskets and then cleaned, fluxed, and dipped in the molten metal. Finally, they are centrifuged to remove...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003211
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...: Soldering iron or bit Flame or torch soldering Hot dip soldering Induction soldering Resistance soldering Furnace soldering Infrared soldering Ultrasonic soldering Wave soldering Laser soldering Hot gas soldering Vapor-phase soldering Each of the methods is described...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005647
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... FRW friction welding FS furnace soldering ft foot FW flash welding g gram g acceleration due to gravity gf gram force GMA gas metal arc GMAC gas metal arc cutting GMAW gas metal arc welding GPa gigapascal GTA gas tungsten arc GTAC gas tungsten arc...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... and soldering appear under the heterogeneous subdivision. Further subclassifications consider use of filler or not (i.e., autogenous welding), as well as other key differences. Fig. 2 Schematic representation of the overall taxonomy of welding processes. GTAW, gas tungsten arc welding; GMAW, gas metal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.9781627081740
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001460
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... hot irons, gas jets, and other instruments. Preforms or solder paste can be placed at the joint area, and the substrate is either directly or indirectly heated, such as by an infrared (IR) furnace, causing the solder to melt and form the joint. Although solder pastes are often used in manual assembly...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001344
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... to such a degree that a new technique for attachment was needed, and surface mounting was developed. Surface mount technology in turn required new ways to make solder joints, prompting the development of vapor phase, infrared, hot gas, and other reflow soldering techniques. Soldering remains the attachment...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001395
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... soldering. IR reflow has continued to evolve. Emphasis has been placed on enhancing heat transfer through forced convection (class 3), also known as convection-dominant reflow soldering ( Fig. 1 and 2 ). Convection evens out the “hot” and “cold” spots caused by different surface adsorptivity...
Book Chapter

By Paul T. Vianco
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... and solder balls by spattering upon contact with the hot solder bath), and reduces thermal shock to the substrate and devices when it passes onto the solder wave. Then, the circuit board contacts the solder wave for the formation of the joints. After passing the wave, the board cools through natural heat...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001459
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...Abstract Abstract Soldering technology has been used in applications ranging from the packaging of integrated circuit chips to the fabrication of industrial heat exchangers and consequently in structural or electronic applications. This article provides information on various soldering...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... such as annealing, hardening, and stress relieving. Stainless steels are commonly joined by welding, brazing, and soldering. The article lists the procedures and precautions that should be instituted during welding to ensure optimum corrosion resistance and mechanical properties in the completed assembly...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003205
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses different types of joining processes, including welding, brazing, soldering, mechanical fastening, and adhesive bonding. It examines two broad classes of welding: fusion welding and solid-state welding. The article discusses the process selection...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001400
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... and the joint gap specified for the final product. Wetting of the parts can be enhanced by hot solder dipping or by electroplating a coating of tin-lead solder on the joint surfaces prior to final assembly. Although typically performed in air, induction soldering can also be practiced in inert atmospheres...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... by a wide variety of hot and cold methods. Can be easily stamped, bent, coined, sheared, spun, upset, swaged, forged, roll threaded, and knurled Weldability Can be readily soldered, brazed, gas tungsten arc welded, gas metal arc welded, or upset welded. its capacity for being oxyfuel gas welded...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.9781627081733
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001487
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... For example, defective or worn electrical insulation cannot be tolerated in arc welding or cutting, nor can defective or worn hoses be used in oxyfuel gas welding and cutting, brazing, or soldering. Proper training in equipment operation is fundamental to safe operation. Persons must be trained...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... turbine blade from oxidation and hot corrosion. Fig. 27 High-temperature oxidation of the tip of an industrial gas turbine blade. Below the tip, a coating is protecting the base metal. See the article “Corrosion of Industrial Gas Turbines” in this Volume. Fig. 28 Severe attack...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006084
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... 19 ), where the melt is substituted by water as a model liquid, have allowed consistent hot performance to be achieved by cold testing. Tests of suction alone have proved poor predictors of hot performance because the gas stream is affected considerably by its interaction with the liquid being...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001492
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...Abstract Abstract This article describes the factors considered in the analysis of brazeability and solderability of engineering materials. These are the wetting and spreading behavior, joint mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, metallurgical considerations, and residual stress levels...