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high-speed steels

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003114
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract This article discusses the characteristics, composition limits, and classification of wrought tool steels, namely high-speed steels, hot-work steels, cold-work steels, shock-resisting steels, low-alloy special-purpose steels, mold steels, water-hardening steels, powder metallurgy tool...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001279
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Porcelain Enameling.” Premilled ready-to-use frit materials are available from frit manufacturers. These prepared products, are mixed and blended (blunged) by the enameler into a suitable enamel slip, using a high-speed blunger operating at 900 to 2000 rev/min. For sheet steel enamels, clays and...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003202
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... steels, high-speed tool steels, low-alloy special-purpose tool steels, and mold steels. The article presents tables that list the temperature ranges, holding time, and hardness values for all of these heat treating processes. heat treating high-carbon high-chromium cold work tool steels high...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001306
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... processing, properties, and applications, can be found in Ref 8 and 9 . Table 2 Composition limits of principal types of tool steels Designations Composition (a) , % AISI SAE UNS C Mn Si Cr Ni Mo W V Co Molybdenum high-speed steels M1 M1 T11301 0.78–0.88 0.15–0.40...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.9781627081610
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... include standard bearing steels, such as high-carbon bearing steels and carburizing bearing steels; and special-purpose bearing steels, such as high-temperature service bearing steels and corrosion-resistant bearing steels. chemical composition rolling-element bearings special-purpose bearing...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... control the effects of strength and work hardening. Rigid equipment and tooling are necessary to prevent chatter. Chip-curler tools are generally recommended because of the tough, stringy chips produced—particularly in machining austenitic and high-alloy ferritic types. Both high-speed tool steels and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001305
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
.... 7. May be applied directly to bright cold-rolled strip Buffing Coloring Full disk or bias-type buff Use stainless steel coloring compound. … For final coloring to bright lusters such as No. 7 and mirror. High speeds for brightness (approximately 50 m/s, or 10,000 sfm). Lower speeds for...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003104
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... range of 65 to 67.5 HRC. However, wear rates varied considerably, as shown in Fig. 9 . The dominant factor seems to have been the content of hard MC-type vanadium carbide (2800 HK), which was highest in the T15 steel and lowest in the T1 and M1 steels. Fig. 9 Wear rates for high-speed steels...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005956
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... quenching speed (X40Cr13, oil, Fig. 7b ) and transforms into martensite after the maximum thermal stresses shows neither shape nor dimensional changes. Using a low-alloy steel with high carbon content and exposing it to a high quenching velocity (C130, water, Fig. 7c ), the stresses due to...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003220
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... °F). Warming the parts in hot water before flash pickling speeds tarnish removal. Water rinsing and drying must follow pickling. The most widely used methods for removing oxides or scale from heat-resistant alloys, in order of decreasing preference based on economic considerations, are acid...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... austenite, neither their carbon nor alloy content can contribute to hardenability. Also, by nucleating transformation products, undissolved carbides can actively decrease hardenability, This is especially important in high-carbon (0.50 to 1.10%) and alloy carburizing steels, which may contain excess...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003102
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Hadfield's austenitic manganese steel exhibits high toughness and ductility with high work-hardening capacity and, usually, good wear resistance. Beginning with an overview of the as-cast properties and composition of these class of steels, this article discusses the heat treatment...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000605
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
... as a result of the high velocity at which a cleavage crack propagates (it has limiting velocity between 0.4 and 0.5 of the speed of sound). The high-speed crack produces a local strain rate too high for slip processes to provide all the accommodation required; thus, many twins are normally formed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001304
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... steel chromate conversion coatings chromium plating cleaning conversion coatings electrochemical finishing electrogalvanizing electroless nickel plating electroplating finishing hardfacing heat treatment high-strength low-alloy steel hot dip coatings ion implantation laser surface...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000609
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
... are common in steels used for hydrogen service (hydrocracking or coal conversion processes, for example) and resemble both failures in “overheated” steel, where reprecipitation of fine grain boundary sulfides due to an overly high austenitization temperature provides the source of the voids, and high...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003809
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... view of corrosion damage but also esthetic values. See the article “Corrosion of Weathering Steels” in this Volume. Much of painted steel used today is prepainted in coil form (coil coated) before shipment to fabricators. Modern, high-speed paint lines can apply a variety of organic coatings on...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003991
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... forging operation. In torsion tests, large strains can be achieved without the limitations imposed by necking, and high strain rates are easily obtained, because the strain rate is proportional to rotational speed. Moreover, friction has no effect on the test, as it does in compression testing. The...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003992
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... have high hardenability to the extent that they are generally air hardened. Therefore, precautions must be taken in cooling forgings of martensitic steels, especially those with high carbon content, in order to prevent cracking. The martensitic alloys are generally cooled slowly to about 590 °C (1100...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... basic AISI grade. Modifications of the basic grades use two digits other than zeroes. For stainless steels that contain high nickel contents (∼25 to 35% Ni), the UNS designation consists of the letter N followed by a five-digit number. Examples include N08020 (20Cb-3), N08024 (20Mo-4), N08026 (20Mo-6...