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heat-resistant ferritic steels

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Heat treating of stainless steel produces changes in physical condition, mechanical properties, and residual stress level and restores maximum corrosion resistance when that property has been adversely affected by previous fabrication or heating. This article focuses on annealing of...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001279
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... permanent deformation or creep of steel due to its own weight during enamel firing. The sag resistance of steel is related to its strength at elevated temperatures and to the temperature at which the steel starts to transform from ferrite to austenite on heating. In general, the higher the strength and the...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003090
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Stretchability Bendability Wear resistance Abrasion resistance Galling resistance Sliding wear resistance Adhesive wear resistance Machinability Weldability Table 1 lists mechanical properties of selected steels in various heat-treated or cold-worked conditions...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Stainless steels are iron-base alloys containing minimum of approximately 11% Cr, and owing to its excellent corrosion resistance, are used for wide range of applications. These applications include nuclear reactor vessels, heat exchangers, oil industry tubular, chemical processing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003812
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... affected by the related high-temperature embrittlement phenomenon. Another problem in high heat input welds is grain growth, particularly in ferritic stainless steels. Excessive grain growth can increase susceptibility to intergranular attack and reduce toughness. Thus, when welding most stainless steels...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003992
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... austenitic stainless steels, martensitic stainless steels, precipitation-hardening stainless steels, and ferritic stainless steels. It concludes with a discussion on the heating and lubrication of dies. austenitic stainless steel cleaning dies ferritic stainless steel forgeability forging forging...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005673
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
..., although cold work and heat treatments during manufacturing may produce regions of magnetic martensite or ferrite that can render a device unsafe in the MR environment. Either of these events also reduces the corrosion resistance, which is undesirable ( Ref 14 ). The 316L stainless steel is listed as...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003180
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... to that experienced in a cobalt-base alloy, an iron-base alloy, AISI type 304 stainless steel, and a low-carbon ferritic steel. Fig. 3 Effect of cold reduction on the hardness of several heat-resistant alloys, type 304 stainless steel, and a low-carbon ferritic steel The differences in...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... breakdown; a homogenization treatment at approximately 1150 °C (2100 °F), to transform some of the delta ferrite to austenite before heating to forging temperature, can be helpful. Austenitic stainless steel forgings should be solution annealed to restore corrosion resistance and maximum ductility. For...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., microstructure and properties. It discusses the grade designations and compositions of cast stainless steels. The article describes the mechanical properties, applications, and corrosion characteristics of corrosion-resistant steel castings and heat-resistant steel castings. cast stainless steels...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003813
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... intergranular corrosion resistance of the alloy. When austenitic or duplex (ferrite in austenite matrix) stainless steels are heated in or cooled slowly through this temperature range, chromium-rich carbides form at grain boundaries in austenitic alloys and at ferrite/austenite interfaces in duplex alloys...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003104
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
.... Fig. 5 Relationship between resistance to gouging abrasion and toughness of various materials. Area A, wrought and cast low-alloy steels; area B, austenitic manganese steels; area C, variety of heat-treated steels; area D, high-chromium white cast irons The wear resistance of ferritic...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... composition, heat treatment, welding, and surface condition on corrosion resistance of stainless steels. It discusses the various forms of corrosion and the important factors to be considered when selecting suitable stainless steel for application in specific corrosive environments. chemical composition...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001307
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... burned and polymerized residues, as well as metallic oxides. These organic components react with the oxygen that is released by the alkaline oxidizing bath. Many finishing operations that are commonly used for steel and other metals are not required for the heat-resistant alloys for...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... range of 275 to 485 MPa (40 to 70 ksi) or perhaps higher can be achieved without heat treatment. Base compositions of these microalloyed ferrite-pearlite forgings are typically 0.3 to 0.5% C and 1.4 to 1.6% Mn. Low-carbon bainitic HSLA steel forgings have also been developed. Heat treated...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... microstructure, which is obtained through the proper combination of steel grade and heat treatment, the single most important factor in achieving levels of rolling-contact fatigue life in bearings is the cleanliness, or freedom from harmful nonmetallic inclusions, of the steel. Bearing steels can be produced by...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001304
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... shape The deoxidation practice , such as killed, semikilled, capped, or rimmed steel The microstructure , such as ferritic, pearlitic, and martensitic The required strength level , as specified in ASTM standards The heat treatment , such as annealing, quenching and tempering, and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001305
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
.... These alloys are magnetic and cannot be hardened by heat treatment. In general, ferritic stainless steels do not have particularly high strength. Their annealed yield strengths range from 275 to 350 MPa (40 to 50 ksi), and their poor toughness and susceptibility to sensitization limit their...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003093
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... used as an alloying element in constructional steels, is a ferrite strengthener. Because nickel does not form any carbide compounds in steel, it remains in solution in the ferrite, thus strengthening and toughening the ferrite phase. Nickel steels are easily heat treated because nickel lowers the...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005936
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... resistance) through high hardness (strength) and/or load-bearing capacity (fatigue strength) through compressive residual stresses near the surface. Furthermore, the focus is mainly on tempering and bearing steels—that is, materials that are heat treated without the need for additional alloying elements as...