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gear life

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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 17 Gear life as a function of specific film thickness (λ) in the boundary lubrication (BL) regime, the mixed lubrication (ML) regime, and in the elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 6 Surface durability curve for gear life rating (contact stress vs. cycles) for normal industry quality material (Grade 1 per Ref 2 ) More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 8 Bending strength curve for gear life rating of normal industry quality material (Grade 1 per Ref 2 ) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002375
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... Abstract This article summarizes the various kinds of gear wear, including fatigue, impact fracture, wear, and stress rupture, describes how gear life in service is estimated. It presents the rules concerning lubricants in designing gearing and analyzing failures of gears. The article presents...
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 23 Effect of retained austenite on gear wear. (a) Depth of wear indentation versus percent retained austenite on the surface of heavily loaded carburized 9317 gears. (b) Gear life as a function of retained austenite More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 8 Performance of surface-treated Ti-6Al-4V gears, (a) Effective life, (b) Effective gear efficiency. Source: Ref 17 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002373
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... Abstract Contact fatigue is a surface-pitting-type failure commonly found in ball or roller bearings. This article discusses the mechanisms of contact fatigue found in gears, cams, valves, rails, and gear couplings. It discusses the statistical analysis of rolling contact bearing-life tests...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... macropitting and surface-origin macropitting. The article describes the factors influencing contact fatigue life of hardened steel bearings and gears, including hardness, inclusions, carbides, and residual stresses. carbides contact fatigue contact fatigue life fatigue cracks hardened bearing steel...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006354
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
..., contact between gear teeth is not optimal because of unavoidable manufacturing inaccuracies. If tribological conditions are favorable, mild adhesive wear occurs during running-in and usually subsides with time, resulting in satisfactory gear life. Wear that occurs during running-in is beneficial...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006358
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... well even when appreciably worn; consequently, gear designers do not always use wear as a critical design parameter. Major considerations in gear design include the following: Gear tooth stress does not exceed a critical value for desired life. Gear materials are of the right kind and quality...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005987
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
...-to-batch distortion variation during heat treatment could necessitate grinding of gear teeth, with a very high associated cost. Furthermore, finish grinding reduces the surface case depth of the case-hardened gear, with an adverse impact on its wear performance and fatigue life. Fig. 1 Major steps...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005842
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract This article focuses on the frequently encountered causes of induction coil failures and typical failure modes in fabrication of hardening inductors, tooth-by-tooth gear-hardening inductors, clamshell inductors, contactless inductors, split-return inductors, butterfly inductors...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003327
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
..., failure; O, runout. Specimen serial numbers 2, 4, and 6. Specimens cut from bar stock, hobbed roots. R , loading; R = 0.1. Frequency, 25 Hz Gear/ tooth Life, cycles × 10 6 2/1 0.263 4/1 0.152 6/1 0.324 2/2 0.270 4/2 0.918 6/2 Run out 2 3  Run out 4/3 Run out 6/3 0.521 2/4...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003986
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... feasibility for forging gears with teeth was established, the resulting gears were fatigue tested and found to have superior low-cycle fatigue life and better endurance limits than conventionally processed spur gears ( Ref 5 , 6 ). The effort was eventually directed at more complex gears. The gears shown...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005867
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... tempering provides additional ductility and toughness to the gear teeth. It is also understood that this hardness is somewhat lower than commonly used hardnesses (HRC 56 to 62) and may negatively affect contact fatigue life. This is the reason why, in cases when the main reason for induction hardening...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002145
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... Abstract This article discusses the different classes of gears, namely, spur, helical, herringbone, crossed-axes helical, worm, internal, rack, bevel, or face-type. It describes the methods used to cut the teeth of gears other than bevel gears: milling, broaching, shear cutting, hobbing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.9781627081672
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006114
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... material, the choice of a PM alloy is governed by the magnitude and nature of the transmitted load, the speed, the life requirements, the environment, the type of lubrication, and the gear and assembly precision. Allowable loads on contact surfaces of gears are limited by the occurrence of pitting, in most...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006820
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... on what should have been the inactive profiles was caused by a torsional vibration in the drive system and resulted in drastically reduced life of many of the driven components. Fig. 14 Auxiliary drive gear from a 3000 kW (4000 hp) oilfield gas engine that always rotates in one direction. The wear...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005952
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... correlation point of 3 16 in. For heavy-duty applications, higher-alloy grades such as 4320, 4817, and 9310 are justifiable if based on actual performance tests. The life testing of gears in the same mountings used in service, to prove both the design and the steel selection, is particularly...