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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004158
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract The corrosion issues in the compressor, combustor and turbine sections of industrial gas turbines used in steam production generally depend on the quality of the fuel, air, and water used in the engine than on the specific industrial application. This article focuses on the forms...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006428
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... Abstract This article illustrates typical wear and friction issues encountered in gas and steam turbines and their consequences as well as commonly adopted materials solutions. It contains tables that present the summary of wear and friction related issues encountered in steam turbines and gas...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005737
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... Abstract This article provides an overview of key thermal spray coatings used in compressors, combustors, and turbine sections of a power-generation gas turbine. It describes the critical components, including combustors, transition ducts, inlet nozzle guide vanes, and first-stage rotating...
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9 Evolution of turbine entry temperature (TET) for aero-engine gas turbines. A high TET is very beneficial for engine overall efficiency. Every 100 °C (180 °F) plus in TET improves efficiency by 2%. TETs of modern engines have surpassed the melting point of hot section component metals More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7 Temperature profile through gas turbine ngine. Gas temperatures exceed melting point of structural materials. LPC, low-pressure compressor; HPC, high-pressure compressor; HPT, high-pressure turbine; LPT, low-pressure turbine More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 835 Segment of a fractured second-stage gas-turbine wheel, cast from alloy 713C, that broke from fatigue in service. (About half of the disk portion of the wheel was never recovered.) The fracture origin (at arrow) was in a grinding-relief groove adjacent to the wheel-balancing pad More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 15 Typical investment cast titanium alloy components used for gas turbine applications More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1 Gas turbine components. TBCs, thermal barrier coatings. Courtesy of Siemens More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 24 Dynamic oxidation, 1177 °C (2150 °F), cyclic. Source: Allison Gas Turbine Division, General Motors Corporation More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 27 High-temperature oxidation of the tip of an industrial gas turbine blade. Below the tip, a coating is protecting the base metal. See the article “Corrosion of Industrial Gas Turbines” in this Volume. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 28 Severe attack of an aeroderivative gas turbine blade by hot corrosion. See the article “Corrosion of Industrial Gas Turbines” in this Volume. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 13 Typical investment cast titanium components used for gas turbine applications More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Severe attack of an aeroderivative gas turbine blade by hot corrosion More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 High-temperature degradation of a gas turbine transition duct. (a) Carbide, carbonitride precipitates, and oxide pentration along grain boundary. (b) Creep cracking along grain-boundary precipitates (arrows) on IN-617 panel. Creep cavities along grain boundaries link up and lead More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 34 Microstructure of Mar-M-247 heat treated cast alloy for gas turbine components showing different sizes of γ′ particles. Electropolished and electroetched. Courtesy of Dr. J.F. Radavich, Micro-Met Laboratories More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Flow diagram for remaining life assessment of gas turbine blades More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Schematic of first-stage gas turbine blade that experienced cracking after 32,000 h in service. (a) Sectioning planes at three locations on the blade airfoil. (b) Cross-sectional view of the blade airfoil showing the cooling holes and numbering sequence More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Resulting fracture surface when gas turbine blade trailing edge crack is broken open in laboratory. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Metallographic cross section through gas turbine blade. Note differences in etched structure near surfaces. Etch: electrolytic, 20% sulfuric acid in methanol. 28× More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 1 (a) Schematic illustration of a gas turbine with key components and examples of wear. Source: Ref 2 , 3 , 4 . (b) Fretting damage location on dovetail joint, Courtesy of Lambda Technologies Group. (c) Microcracks on dovetail joint, Courtesy of Lambda Technologies Group. (d) Droplet More