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gas tungsten arc welding

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001336
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract The gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process is performed using a welding arc between a nonconsumable tungsten-base electrode and the workpieces to be joined. The arc discharge requires a flow of electrons from the cathode through the arc column to the anode. This article discusses two...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005590
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract The gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process derives the heat for welding from an electric arc established between a tungsten electrode and the part to be welded. This article provides a discussion on the basic operation principles, advantages, disadvantages, limitations...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005622
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract Penetration-enhanced gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes have been referred to variously as flux tungsten inert gas (TIG), A-TIG, and GTAW with a penetration-enhancing compound. This article provides a discussion on the principles of operation, advantages, disadvantages...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001356
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract The melting temperature necessary to weld materials in the gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process is obtained by maintaining an arc between a tungsten alloy electrode and a workpiece. This article discusses the advantages and limitations and applications of the GTAW process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005664
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article provides the basic physics of the two most widely used arc welding processes: gas tungsten arc welding and gas metal arc welding. It describes the various control parameters of these processes such as arc length control, voltage control, heat input control, and metal...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Effect of vertex angle on gas tungsten arc welding arc column temperature distribution with 100% Ar used as shielding gas. (a) 30° electrode vertex angle. (b) 90° electrode vertex angle. Welding current, 150 A More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 10 Plot of gas tungsten arc welding arc column temperature distribution as a function of anode distance and arc position. Welding parameters: electrode vertex angle, 30°; current, 150 A; shielding gas, 10Ar-90He More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 11 Plot of gas tungsten arc welding arc column temperature distribution relative to anode distance and arc position. Welding parameters: electrode vertex angle, 30°; current, 300 A; shielding gas, 100% Ar More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Examples of gas tungsten arc welding application in welding tubular assemblies More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Gas tungsten arc welding schematic More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Gas tungsten arc welding water-cooled torch More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 4 Gas tungsten arc welding process schematic More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 6 Examples of gas tungsten arc welding applications. (a) Horizontal fillet welds. (b) Root-pass heavy wall pipe. (c, d) Aluminum alloy welds. (e) Titanium components welded in vacuum chamber. (f) Chromium-molybdenum steel component More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 8 Schematic of gas tungsten arc welding, direct current electrode negative More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 Characteristics of current types for gas tungsten arc welding. DCEN, direct current electrode negative; DCEP, direct current electrode positive; ac, alternating current. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 12 Pulsed-wave shapes attainable with gas tungsten arc welding power supply More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 20 Trailing shield. GTAW, gas tungsten arc welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 22 Schematic of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with hot wire feed. ac, alternating current; dc, direct current More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Schematic illustration comparing (a) gas tungsten arc welding and (b) plasma arc welding processes. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 13 Schematic of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with hot wire feed. ac, alternating current; dc, direct current More