1-20 of 614 Search Results for

gas evolution

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006298
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... Abstract Modeling of gas evolution during sand mold castings is one of the most important technical and environmental issues facing the metal casting industry. This article focuses on describing the capability of numerically predicting gas evolution for the furan binder/silica sand system...
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 15 Hydrogen gas evolution at a pinhole receiving cathodic protection More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 48 A Pt-5Ru alloy showing the effect of gas evolution during investment casting More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 32 Pores formed by gas evolution in the casting. (a) Light micrograph of a pore in aluminum-silicon alloy. Etchant: 0.5% HF. Source: Ref 22 . (b) Scanning electron microscopy image of pore in unmodified aluminum-silicon alloy. Source: Ref 23 More
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 19 Eight typical conditions of commercial steel ingots, cast in identical bottle-top molds, in relation to the degree of suppression of gas evolution. The dotted line indicates the height to which the steel originally was poured in each ingot mold. Depending on the carbon and, more More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Eight typical conditions of commercial steel ingots, cast in identical bottle-top molds, in relation to the degree of suppression of gas evolution. The dotted line indicates the height to which the steel originally was poured in each ingot mold. Depending on the carbon and, more More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9 Evolution of turbine entry temperature (TET) for aero-engine gas turbines. A high TET is very beneficial for engine overall efficiency. Every 100 °C (180 °F) plus in TET improves efficiency by 2%. TETs of modern engines have surpassed the melting point of hot section component metals More
Image
Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 9 Superheat effect on the average rate evolution of gas generated (cylindrical geometry, steel 4140 castings, superheats of 50 and 110 °C, or 120 and 230 °F). Source: Ref 11 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1994
acid 0.9 mL (2.4 × 10 −4 gal), nitrite accelerator 1.5 mL (4.0 × 10 −4 gal); acid checked with 10 mL (2.6 × 10 −3 gal) sample, accelerator checked with gas evolution apparatus More
Book Chapter

By David V. Neff
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Abstract Gas porosity is a major factor in the quality and reliability of castings. The major cause of gas porosity in castings is the evolution of dissolved gases from melting and dross or slag containing gas porosity. Degassing is the process of removing these gases. This article describes...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005192
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... copper alloys ferrous metals magnesium alloys nonferrous metals solidification solubilities GAS POROSITY is one of the most serious problems in the casting of both ferrous and nonferrous metals. It is generally caused by the evolution of gases during the casting and solidification process...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... are examples of semikilled ingots with increasing amounts of gas evolution. Ingot 5 is an example of a capped ingot where gas evolution is sufficient to alter solidification structures at the surface in the upper portions of the ingot. Ingots 6 to 8 are rimmed ingots with increasing amounts of gas evolution...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005222
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... be compensated ( Ref 1 ). Gas porosity occurs when the gas concentration in the liquid is higher than its solubility ( Ref 2 ). The causes of porosity formation for these two types of porosity are inadequate feeding and gas evolution. Under some conditions, one pore formation mechanism is dominant so that one...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003727
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... in copper concentration across a 600 mm (24 in.) thick direct-chill semicontinuous cast ingot of 2124 alloy. Source: Ref 4 Defects Macroporosity and Microshrinkage Gas evolution during solidification is responsible for at least two casting defects: macroporosity and microshrinkage (also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001405
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... At intermediate rates, the gas can nucleate and, depending on the amount of gas dissolved in the weld metal and the weld-solidification rates, develop bubbles that become trapped. A very severe form of porosity, called worm holes, occurs when the rates of gas evolution and solidification are similar, causing...