1-20 of 236 Search Results for

fusion zone segregation

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003785
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
...: the fusion zone, heat-affected zone, and unaffected base metal. These zones are shown in Fig. 1 , 2 , and 3 . The fusion zone is the material that was melted during welding. It is bordered by the fusion line. The fusion zone material usually has a chemical composition similar to that of the base metal(s...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001423
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... and carbides (heat-affected zone grain boundaries cracking), are also discussed. The article examines the parameters that affect heat-affected zone liquation cracking and presents a solution for each problem. carbides hardening nonferrous high-temperature materials physical metallurgy segregation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001429
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... can be welded autogeneously (no filler added), as in the case of welded tubular products. Three issues should be considered in terms of the fusion zone: Effect of weld metal segregation on corrosion resistance Propensity to form porosity Solidification hot-crack sensitivity Segregation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001471
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... influence the corrosion process in the vicinity of the weld. This dissimilar-metal couple can produce macroscopic galvanic corrosion. The fusion zone itself offers a microscopic galvanic effect due to microstructural segregation resulting from solidification ( Ref 4 ). The fusion zone also has a thin...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001034
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
..., the weldment is generally divided into two main regions: the fusion zone, or weld metal, and the heat-affected zone (HAZ), as shown in Fig. 1 . Within the fusion zone, the peak temperature exceeds the melting point of the base metal, and the chemical composition of the weld metal will depend on the choice...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001415
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... in the joining of advanced, elevated-temperature titanium alloys that contain rare earth elements for dispersoid strengthening ( Ref 17 ). Figure 11 shows the fusion zone of a laser weld in a rapidly-solidified, powder metallurgy Ti-8Al-2.8Sn-5.4Hf-3.6Ta-1Y-0.2Si (wt%) alloy. The segregation of yttrium...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003171
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Solidification is a comprehensive process of transformation of the melt of metals and alloys into a solid piece, involving formation of dendrites, segregation which involves change in composition, zone formation in final structure of the casting, and microporosity formation during...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006808
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... are currently in use, as described in the section “Fitness-for-Service Codes” in this article. Cracks caused by welding essentially always form within the fusion and/or heat-affected zones. In terms of location, surface cracks are most harmful, partly because they are exposed to environmental effects...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005613
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... in a weldment. It reviews the heat-affected and fusion zones of single-pass and multi-pass weldments. The article also includes a discussion on the welds in alloy systems, such as stainless steels and aluminum-base, nickel-base, and titanium-base alloys. aluminum-base alloys casting fusion zone heat...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001413
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... Postcasting solution heat treatments used to prepare corrosion-resistant alloys for service are insufficient to homogenize the microstructure. The inhomogeneous microstructure of both groups of alloys will tend to promote relatively wide areas of partial melting adjacent to the fusion zone when compared...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005609
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... solidification solid-liquid interface growth rate solute redistribution supercooling temperature gradient welding MICROSTRUCTURAL EVOLUTION during solidification of the fusion zone represents one of the most important considerations for controlling the properties of welds. A wide range...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005521
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... mechanical properties of the cast parts. Their internal structure, characterized by a dendrite arm spacing and its associated distribution of chemical species (known as segregation), also contributes to the control of properties. If the dendritic structure first forms on cooling from the liquid state...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001341
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... in a Weldment Several aspects of the weld thermal cycle and weld segregation should be considered because of their effect on the transformation upon cooling: Peak temperatures reached in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) can be very much higher than the Ac 3 temperature (that is, the temperature at which...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001472
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... are scribed on both sides of the unwelded joint at the crown and root surfaces. Missed seams, which result from misalignment of the electron beam with the joint such that the fusion zone fails to encompass the entire joint, are detected by observing the number of witness lines remaining on either side...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001342
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article discusses four types of defects in materials that have been fusion welded and that have been the focus of much attention because of the magnitude of their impact on product quality. These include hot cracks, heat-affected zone (HAZ) microfissures, cold cracks, and lamellar...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005639
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
..., discussed in the following section. Forces Acting on Microwelds In the previous section, fluid convection was noted as providing enhanced thermal transport and affecting segregation in weld fusion zones. Because of these major effects, the various forces driving (and resisting) fluid flow...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005406
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... are caused by the development of equiaxed grains in preferred zones, leading to instability of the segregation field that further develops with the propagation of the mushy zone. It is interesting to observe the formation of channels in the top left side of Fig. 9(b) . The mechanism that led...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005236
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... as mesosegregations are also predicted at a smaller length scale. These variations are caused by the development of equiaxed grains in preferred zones, leading to instability of the segregation field that further develops with the propagation of the mushy zone. It is interesting to observe the formation of channels...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005210
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... generated at the interface is dissipated through the solid. Such a temperature field gives rise to directional solidification and results in the columnar zone in a casting. The conditions for the stability of a planar front, discussed in the previous article, “Plane Front Solidification,” by Kurz, show...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001428
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... will conduct heat away from the fusion zone and therefore requires slightly more heat input during welding than would an alloy with low thermal conductivity, which retains the local heat of welding for a longer time. The nickel-base alloys vary considerably in their thermal conductivity characteristics...