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focused ion beam

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006677
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... Abstract This article is intended to provide the reader with a good understanding of the underlying science, technology, and the most common applications of focused ion beam (FIB) instruments. It begins with a survey of the various types of FIB instruments and their configurations, discusses...
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 39 (a) Ion beam and (b) electron beam images of a plasma focused ion beam serial-sectioning tomography acquisition on an aluminum alloy showing key geometric features, including the cross-sectional face, redeposition trench, fiducial marks, and protective pad on the top surface. In (b More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 A single magnesium alloy powder particle showing the focused ion beam milling technique to achieve 100 nm thickness for electron transparency for TEM. Courtesy of University of Central Florida More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 10 High-resolution images of focused ion beam (FIB)-sectioned powder particles. (a) Scanning electron microscope/scanning electron detector image. (b) FIB-charged device model image. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 5 Scanning electron microscopy images of a focused ion beam cross-sectioned electroplating sample prepared from (a) low current density plating of gold, resulting in large, dense grain deposits on top of the porous rhenium, and (b) high current density plating of gold, resulting in small More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 1 (a) Stand-alone or single-column focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. (b) The more common configuration, with both FIB and scanning electron microscope (SEM) on a single platform More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 5 Aperture blade typical of what is integrated in most focused ion beam columns More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 18 Environmental cell allows focused ion beam experiments with liquids or high gas pressures More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 33 Charging mechanisms for the focused ion beam (left) and scanning electron microscope (right). λ = characteristic escape depth for secondary electrons More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 35 The various focused ion beam (FIB) applications are built on one or more of these capabilities. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 36 (a) Typical focused ion beam (FIB)/sample orientation for top-down delayering. (b) FIB image of newly exposed surface More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 37 (a) Typical focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) geometry for producing a cross section. (b) Cross section of a spherical particle from an iron powder. SEM image nicely shows the surface newly exposed by FIB milling. Courtesy of Tescan Orsay Holding, a.s. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 42 Single-crystalline copper sample gallium focused ion beam milled to create cantilevers for testing. Reprinted with permission from Ref 70 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 48 Helium focused ion beam image of graphene supported by gallium nitride pillars. Courtesy of M. Latzel, M. Heilmann, G. Sarau, and S.H. Christiansen, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen, Germany More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 51 Cesium focused ion beam images of pencil lead taken with a 20 μm field of view with a foreign particle at the center. The secondary electron image (a) offers topographic information, while the positive secondary ion image (b) provides striking contrast arising from the compositional More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 58 Focused-ion-beam-deposited insulating silicon oxide pads. Courtesy of Carl Zeiss More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 59 Three-dimensional helium-focused-ion-beam-grown structure using the platinum precursor Me 3 PtCpMe. Source: Ref 111 . Reprinted with permission from Cambridge University Press More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 60 Thin film of Y-Ba-Cu-O patterned by a focused ion beam (FIB) to make a Josephson junction. In applications such as these, sputtering by the FIB is not essential; the ion beam need only disrupt the otherwise critical atomic structure through displacements. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 65 Most basic circuit edit with focused ion beam (FIB) cuts and FIB-deposited metal lines to connect one layer to the next More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 42 Focused ion beam cross section of the defect. (a) Secondary electron image. (b) Color Auger images of silicon in the oxide form (red), silicon in the elemental form (green), and tungsten (blue). Courtesy of Physical Electronics, USA More