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flotation

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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 10 Calculated time of flotation of inclusions in stagnant melts as a function of inclusion size. Melt depth: A, 50 mm (2 in.); B, 500 mm (20 in.); C, 2000 mm (80 in.). Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 8 Removal of fines from lubricants by settling (a), by flotation (b), in a hydrocyclone (c), in a centrifuge (d), and in a magnetic drum (e) More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Appearance of graphite (carbon) flotation on machined surfaces of blocks cast from ductile iron with 4.9% C equivalent More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Sedimentation/flotation of inclusions in aluminum melts More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 8 Sample with graphite flotation present due to high carbon equivalent More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 35 Graphite flotation and degenerated graphite particles are shown at three magnifications. Used with permission from Ref 13 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 37 Carbon flotation in ductile iron. Used with permission from Ref 13 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 38 Carbon flotation with exploded graphite. Used with permission from Ref 13 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 2 Appearance of graphite (carbon) flotation on machined surfaces of blocks cast from ductile iron with 4.9% C equivalent More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 5 Flotation of pyrrhotite as a function of contact time with glass, mild steel (MS) and austenitic stainless steel in air-exposed distilled water at natural pH unless indicated otherwise. Comparison of MS in bubbled environment given. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 11 Batch flotation results using potassium ethyl xanthate (KEX) on a quartzite with 5% pyrrhotite mixture ground with various cast iron ball materials under (a) nitrogen or (b) oxygen atmosphere. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 9 Three-rotor spinning nozzle inert flotation degassing unit for wrought aluminum casting application. Courtesy of SNIF Systems, Pyrotek, Inc. More
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005351
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... the factors that influence the formation of inclusions. The article describes the three basic methods of mechanically removing or separating inclusions from molten metal. The methods include sedimentation, flotation, and positive filtration. The article provides a discussion on the types of molten-metal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003629
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... and relative significance of corrosion and abrasion in wear. Galvanic interactions in multielectrode systems are reviewed. The article presents a case history on the material selection for grinding balls to minimize corrosion loss and the adverse effect on flotation. wear corrosive wear mill atmosphere...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., separators, and flotation devices that are used for particle size reduction, separation of particles according to their settling rates in fluids and dewatering of concentrate particles. It explains the basic principles, flow diagrams, ore concentrate preparation methods, and equipment of major types...
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 7 Treating the aluminum melt with flushing gas in the spinning nozzle inert flotation process. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 34 Treating the aluminum melt with flushing gas in the spinning nozzle inert flotation (SNIF) process. Source: Ref 36 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 5 Shredder and sorter for scrap automobiles. (a) Vehicles are shredded. Air separates out most light nonmetals (1) from heavier materials (2). (b) Magnetic belt separates ferromagnetic metals from nonmagnetic materials. (c) Heavy-metal flotation. (d) Melting furnaces further sort out More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006338
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... of shrink/porosity-related cases seen by Elkem’s technical service engineers. Other common defects may be divided into two basic categories: Those related to nodule shape and size, such as compacted graphite structures, exploded and chunky graphite, graphite flotation, spiky graphite, and nodule...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006310
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
.... The optimal range for this element is usually 3.4 to 3.8%, depending on silicon content. Above this range, there is a danger of graphite flotation, especially in heavy sections, and of increased casting expansion during solidification, leading to unsoundness, particularly in soft green sand molds. Below...