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flaws

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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 13 Nomenclature for fracture features. (a) Surface flaws. (b) Volume flaws. Source: Ref 4 , 34 More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 31 View of (a) effective intralaminar flaws. (b) Effective interlaminar flaws More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Critical sizes of internal flaws at various stress levels. Surface flaws are a factor of 1.1 lower. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 11 Schematic of crack growth from preexisting flaws under (a) static and (b) dynamic uniaxial compressive loads More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 8 Electron-beam welds showing flaws that can occur in poor welds and the absence of flaws in a good weld with reinforcement More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 11 Plasma arc welds showing flaws that can occur in poor welds and the absence of flaws in good reinforced weld More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 3 Relative strength of adhesive and adherends, as affected by bond flaws. τ p is the maximum shear stress, σ ∞ is the remote skin stress. More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 4 Redistribution of load at flaws in bond More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10 Flaws occurring in high-frequency-welded steel tube and pipe. (a) Lack of fusion, whole seam. (b) Lack of fusion, partial (mating fracture surfaces). ID, inside diameter; OD, outside diameter. (c) Entrapment, oxides. (d) Entrapment, black spot. (e) Prearc. (f) Porosity. (g) Cold weld More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11 Typical flaws in double submerged-arc-welded steel pipe. (a) Incomplete fusion. (b) Incomplete penetration. (c) Offset of plate edges. (d) Out-of-line weld beads (off-seam). (e) Porosity (gas pocket). (f) Slag inclusions. (g) Weld-area crack More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 13 Typical flaws in seamless tubing. (a) Blister. (b) Gouge. (c) Lamination. (d) Lap (arrow). (e) Pit. (f) Plug scores. (g) Rolled-in slugs. (h) Scab. (j) Seam (arrow) More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 3 Effect of distance (depth) of flaws of equal size from the entry surface of a test piece on the echo height of ultrasonic indications More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 35 Ultrasonic indications from four types of flaws found in castings More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 3 Use of scanning acoustical holography for the examination of flaws in the butt welding of a 152 mm (6 in.) thick steel plate. (a) Transducer locations above plate surface. (b) Flaw detected with +45° shear sound wave. (c) Flaw detected with 0° longitudinal sound wave. (d) Flaw detected More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 44 Eddy current fixturing setup for locating and sizing flaws in Saturn V/S-1C rocket booster tank-wall skin sections using a two-step process. (a) Surface discontinuities with depths ≥5% of skin section thickness are first located with 37 m/min (120 sfm) linear scanner. Radac, rapid More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11 Schematic of flaws and their x-ray images. Defect types that can be detected by x-ray radiography are those that change the attenuation of the transmitted x-rays. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 2 Ten different types of flaws that may be found in rolled bars. See text for discussion. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 20 Coil assembly used for the simultaneous detection of flaws and of variation in composition, structure, and hardness in steel bars. Dimension given in inches More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 28 Detectability of different ellipsoidal flaws as a function of their orientation and shape. The shape of the ellipsoid is changed by varying the aspect ratio, where two of the major axes are kept equal and the third is decreased. The ratio of the constant major axes to the smaller More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11 Strong and weak flaws in a twelve-ply carbon-epoxy panel. A 13 mm (0.5 in.) diameter flat-bottom hole behaves as a strong flaw, (a) appearing as a hot spot in the infrared image and (c) deviating from the background in the logarithmic temperature-versus-time plot. Weaker polymer More