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fitness-for-service life assessment

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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003512
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... information on fatigue life assessment, elevated-temperature life assessment, and fitness-for-service life assessment. elevated-temperature life assessment fabrication failure analysis fatigue life assessment fitness-for-service life assessment material defects nondestructive inspection stress...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006823
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... Abstract This article illustrates the use of the fitness-for-service (FFS) code to assess the serviceability and remaining life of a corroded flare knockout drum from an oil refinery, two fractionator columns affected by corrosion under insulation in an organic sulfur environment...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001477
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Fig. 10 Creep damage classification system proposed by Wedel and Neubauer. Source: Ref 21 Abstract Fitness-for-service assessment procedures can be used to assess the integrity, or remaining life, of components in service. Depending on the operating environment and the nature...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004215
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of likely remaining service life. Any inspection data and the rates and predictions made from them should be compared with the predictions of deterioration made at the risk-assessment stage when setting the inspection strategy. If the measured rate is at variance with these predictions, it is likely...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002384
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... to be assessed on a fitness-for-service basis. Using this concept, a structure is considered fit for the intended service if it can operate safely throughout its design life. The adoption of fitness-for-service concepts in several industry standards has resulted in the development of rigorous fatigue...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003289
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Abstract This article discusses the methods for assessing creep-rupture properties, particularly, nonclassical creep behavior. The determination of creep-rupture behavior under the conditions of intended service requires extrapolation and/or interpolation of raw data. The article describes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006780
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... data are available in standard fitness-for-service publications ( Ref 17 ). The stress-rupture strength of a metallic material is determined by measuring the time to fracture as a function of temperature and applied stress. Logarithmic (log-log) plots of normal stress (σ) versus rupture life (RL...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002402
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
...” material and derive fracture mechanics properties. As part of the development of a fitness-for-service assessment methodology, for example, the Materials Properties Council has collected fracture toughness data for carbon and Cr-Mo steels. These data have been compared to lower-bound curves more or less...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003706
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... capability above and beyond the entire system design life or even beyond their own design life, especially if careful inspection and maintenance procedures have verified this. To assist in making a remain-in- service decision, it is important that a structural assessment determine the additional service-life...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003545
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... in the article “Elevated-Temperature Life Assessment for Turbine Components, Piping, and Tubing” in this Volume. Fig. 2 Creep crack in a turbine vane. Courtesy of Mohan Chaudhari, Columbus Metallurgical Services On the other hand, creep damage can also be localized, particularly for thick-section...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003514
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... sampling probabilistic analysis probability of failure response surface method risk analysis system reliability target reliability time-variant reliability APPLICATION of probabilistic analysis methods for life assessment of structural components is becoming more prevalent because...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003456
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... of aluminum and introduced new damage phenomena that were complex by comparison. This complicated the maintenance actions of damage assessment, inspection, and repair. These problems, not foreseen at the design stage, made in-service damage a frequent occurrence, which was further aggravated by the lack...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003528
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... in determining the effective service life of a component. When the failure analyst suspects residual stress as a contributing factor to a premature failure, such suspicions may be validated by experiment and by measurement. X-ray diffraction residual stress measurement analysis should be specified when damaged...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004128
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... if the corrosion damage obtained in these accelerated tests is similar to that found in service. Pitting and exfoliation corrosion, followed by crevice corrosion and pillowing, have received the most attention. The two most common fatigue life assessment methods used in the military aerospace industry...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002472
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... °C (900 °F). (b) At 540 °C (1000 °F). (c) At 565 °C (1050 °F). (d) At 595 °C (1100 °F). Source: Ref 85 Fig. 26 Creep life assessment based on cavity classification in boiler steels. Source: Ref 87 Fig. 27 The design-for-performance concept. Source: Ref 92 Fig. 28...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002470
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... and creep properties for elevated-temperature conditions Fatigue crack initiation of undamaged structure Fail-safe structure must meet customer service life requirements for operational loading conditions. Safe-life components must remain crack-free in service. Replacement times must be specified...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.9781627081801
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003509
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... electron beam welds electroslag welds fatigue fitness-for-service assessment flash welds friction welding high-frequency induction welds inclusions joint design laser beam welds mechanical testing porosity upset butt welds weld discontinuity weldment failure weldment integrity WELDMENT...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006014
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
..., and other foreign matter. All oils, small deposits of asphalt paint, and grease shall have been removed by solvent cleaning (see NAPF 500-03-01). Four degrees of abrasive blast cleaning for fittings are available, depending on the type of service for which the fitting is intended and on the type of coating...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006768
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... and the optimization of production parameters for extending the service life of components. This article focuses primarily on what the analyst should know about applying XRD residual-stress measurement techniques to failure analysis. Discussions are extended to the description of ways in which XRD can be applied...