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ferrite-martensite microstructure

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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 1 Ferrite-martensite microstructure of a dual-phase steel (0.06% C, 1.5% Mn; water quenched from 760 °C, or 1400 °F). Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 7 Ferrite-martensite microstructure of a dual-phase steel (0.06% C, 1.5% Mn; water quenched from 760 °C, or 1400 °F). Source: Ref 49 More
Book Chapter

By G.R. Speich
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001026
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... Abstract Dual-phase steels are a new class of high-strength low alloy (HSLA) steels characterized by a microstructure consisting of about 20% hard martensite particles dispersed in a soft ductile ferrite matrix. In addition to high tensile strength, in the range of 550 MPa (80 ksi), dual-phase...
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 55 Martensitic microstructure, with δ-ferrite, in as-cast 410 stainless steel (441 HV). Etched with Vilella's reagent More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001008
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... and the phase transformations that change the structure and properties at varying levels of carbon content. Microstructures described include pearlite, bainite, proeutectoid ferrite and cementite, ferrite-pearlite, and martensite. The article depicts some of the primary processing steps that result in ferrite...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003090
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... and cast irons, the microstructural constituents have the names ferrite, pearlite, bainite, martensite, cementite, and austenite. The article presents four examples that have very different microstructures: the structural steel has a ferrite plus pearlite microstructure; the rail steel has a fully...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003246
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
.... The white matrix phase is ferrite, the small outlined white particles are retained austenite, and the small dark patches are auto-tempered martensite (and a minor amount of retained austenite). A large nitride particle is also shown at the bottom of the field. Fig. 20 Microstructure of heat treated...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002461
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... of these factors in both theoretical and practical terms, with particular focus on the role of microstructure in various irons. These include bainite, pearlite, ferfite, martensite, austenite, ferrite-pearlite, ferrite-cementite, ferrite-martensite, graphite, and cementite. The article discusses the evolution...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003763
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... and can exhibit variations of the main constituents: ferrite, cementite, pearlite, bainite, and martensite. Some of the low-alloy steels may contain retained austenite. These microstructural constituents are subsequently described in brief. There are a number of references available that provide detailed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001407
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... by microstructure and are described as ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, or duplex. The article illustrates compositional ranges of the ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, and duplex alloys in the Schaeffler diagram. It describes the metallurgical aspects of welded stainless steels to be considered for particular...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... and low-alloyed irons containing ferrite, pearlite, the phosphorus eutectic (steadite), cementite, martensite, and bainite can be etched successfully with nital at room temperature to reveal all of these microstructural constituents. Usually, this is a 2 to 4% alcohol solution of nitric acid (HNO 3...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005819
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... ferrite heat treatment iron-carbon phase diagram isothermal transformation martensite pearlite residual stress steel thermal stress Introduction Heat treatment is roughly defined as controlled heating and cooling of a solid material, so as to change the microstructure and obtain specific...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005859
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... for 1042 steel with three starting microstructures: large-grained ferrite with coarse pearlite (identified as the annealed steel); finer-grained ferrite with finer pearlite (identified as the normalized steel); and a quenched and tempered martensitic steel ( Ref 4 ). In these microstructures, the primary...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003110
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... of malleable irons with emphasis on its composition and heat treatment. The article provides information on the specifications and mechanical properties of different types of malleable irons, such as ferritic, pearlitic, and martensitic malleable irons. chemical composition ferritic malleable iron...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006342
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... microstructure. Picral is safer to be stored in the lab than nital, which can be an explosive mixture under certain conditions when it is stored in a tightly closed bottle. Fig. 17 Austempered ductile iron (Fe-3.6%C-2.5%Si-0.056%P-0.052%Mg-0.7%Cu). Martensite and acicular ferrite. The casting...
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 18 Artifact microstructures in (a), (b), and (c) that developed by heating the specimen during sectioning on an abrasive cutoff wheel. (a) Tempered martensite (gray) in a ferrite matrix (white). (b) Tempered martensite (gray) and pearlite (dark) in a ferrite matrix (white). (c) Pearlite More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 15 International Institute of Welding scheme for classifying microstructural constituents in ferritic steel weld metals with the optical microscope. Source: Ref 23 Category Abbreviation Primary ferrite PF  Grain boundary ferrite PF(G)  Intragranular polygonal More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003767
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... structures vary according to the type of steel, such as ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, precipitation hardenable, or duplex. electropolishing procedures etching techniques grinding devices macroscopic examination maraging steels metallography maraging steel microstructures microscopic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4F
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 February 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v4F.a0006995
EISBN: 978-1-62708-450-5
... than martensite and stronger than pearlite. Bainite is tougher than martensite and pearlite. It is a microstructure consisting of ferrite and cementite that can take different forms, unlike pearlite in which cementite and ferrite form lamellar arrays. Figure 15 shows upper and lower bainite...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract Stainless steels are primarily alloys of iron and chromium. They are grouped into five families, primarily based on their microstructure: ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening. Three out of the five families of stainless steels, namely, austenitic...