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extensometers

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003288
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... and rupture strengths of materials. The article describes the different types of equipment for determination of creep characteristics, including test stands, furnaces, and extensometers. It also discusses the different testing methods for creep rupture: constant-load testing and constant-stress testing...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Bending fixture and specimen with extensometer More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 6 Biaxial extensometer for simultaneous measurement of axial and torsional strain. (a) Adjustment screws and clamps. (b) Extensometer mounted on specimen. Courtesy Instron Corporation More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 7 Typical rod-and-tube-type extensometer for elevated-temperature creep testing. Extensometer is clamped to grooves machined in the shoulders of the test specimen. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 10 Test specimen with an extensometer attached to measure specimen deformation. Courtesy of Epsilon Technology Corporation More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 12 Dial-type extensometer, 50 mm (2 in.) gage length More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 13 Averaging LVDT extensometer (50 mm, or 2 in. gage length) mounted on a threaded tension specimen More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 14 Breakaway-type LVDT extensometer (50 mm, or 2 in. gage length) that can remain on the specimen through rupture More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 15 Averaging LVDT extensometer (50 mm, or 2 in. gage length) mounted on a 0.127 mm (0.005 in.) wire specimen. The extensometer is fitted with a low-pressure clamping arrangement (film clamps) and is supported by a counterbalance device. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 17 Bench-top UTM with laser extensometer. Courtesy of Tinius Olsen Testing Machine Company, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 18 Test setup using wedge grips on (a) a flat specimen with axial extensometer and (b) a round specimen with diametral extensometer More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 27 Water-cooled extensometer used up to 500 °C (932 °F) More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 28 Air-cooled extensometer used at temperatures up to 2500 °C (4532 °F) More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 5 KGR-1 extensometer with thick adherend specimen. Source: Ref 1 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003259
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
.... If the crosshead speed is too high, inertia effects can become important in the analysis of the specimen stress state. Under conditions of high crosshead speed, errors in the load cell output and crosshead position data may become unacceptably large. A potential exists to damage load cells and extensometers under...
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 16 Fatigue test specimen with bonded resistance strain gages and a 25 mm (1 in.) gage length extensometer mounted on the reduced section More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 15 A schematic of a tensile test. The sample is elongated at a specified rate, and the force required to produce a given elongation is measured by the load cell. Elongation is measured by an extensometer or similar device. Source: Ref 4 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003266
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Characteristics A typical high-temperature mechanical test setup is shown in Fig. 22 . The system is the same as that used at room temperature, except for the high-temperature capabilities, including the furnace, cooling system, grips, and extensometer. In this system, the grips are inside the chamber...
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Published: 01 June 2012
set. (Note that these are not cycling tests but individual tests from virgin wires. Tests were conducted with an extensometer in air at a strain rate of 0.03%/s; the A f temperature of the wire is –12 °C, or 10 °F.) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003314
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Elevated Temperature Tension Tests of Metallic Materials Guidance for elevated temperature testing E 74 Calibration of Force-Measuring Instruments for Verifying the Force Indication of Testing Machines Calibration of force standards E 83 Verification and Classification of Extensometers...