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explosion welding

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005602
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article provides an overview of the important mechanistic aspects of explosion welding (EXW), the process-material interactions, and the critical aspects or parameters that must be controlled. The procedure for ensuring the control of process parameters is also discussed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001351
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW), also known as explosive bonding, is accomplished by a high-velocity oblique impact between two metals. This article describes the practice of producing an explosive bond/weld and draws on many previous research results in order to explain the mechanisms...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001449
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW), like all other welding or joining processes, has a well defined set of input parameters or conditions that must fall within certain limits for the desired weld quality to be achieved. This article provides an overview of the important mechanistic aspects of EXW...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001376
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Explosion welding (EXW) is a solid-state metal-joining process that uses explosive force to create an electron-sharing metallurgical bond between two metal components. This article discusses the process attributes of EXW, including metallurgical attributes, metal combinations, size...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 Parallel-plate explosion welding process. (a) Explosion-cladding assembly before detonation. (b) Explosion-cladding assembly during detonation. (c) Close-up of (b) showing mechanism for jetting away the surface layer from the parent layer More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Schematic showing mechanics of explosion welding. (a) Alignment of components to be joined before detonation. (b) Motion of components at detonation. (c) Close-up view of jet and wavy interface characteristic of explosion welding process More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 6 Explosion welding interface exhibits patterns similar to flowing fluid, even though metals remain as solids. Right side shows explosion welding interface patterns; left side shows pattern of fluid flow around a pin. Velocity increases from top to bottom in both cases. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 11 Test specimens of explosion welding interface showing ductile failure in the parent steel. (a) Shear strength test. (b) Tensile strength test More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 18 Schematic illustration of the explosion welding process showing (a) the typical component arrangement and (b) the characteristic action between components during welding. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Schematic showing key components used in the parallel gap explosive welding process More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001467
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., namely, gas-tungsten arc welding, gas-metal arc welding, electron-beam and laser-beam welding, resistance welding, furnace brazing, friction welding, and explosion welding. alumina electron-beam welding explosion welding friction welding furnace brazing gas-metal arc welding gas-tungsten arc...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005646
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article is a compilation of definitions for terms related to welding fundamentals and all welding processes. The processes include arc and resistance welding, friction stir welding, laser beam welding, explosive welding, and ultrasonic welding. arc welding explosive welding...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract This article describes the mechanism, advantages and disadvantages, fundamentals, capabilities, variations, equipment used, and weldability of metals in solid-state welding processes, including diffusion bonding, explosion welding, friction welding, ultrasonic welding, upset welding...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Plot of collision angle versus collision velocity to obtain a typical explosion welding process parametric envelope for both similar- and dissimilar-metal combinations. See text for details. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Failure in copper-to-stainless steel tensile specimen that was explosion welded. (a) Photomicrograph of failed specimen showing wavy bond line and ductile fracture in parent copper metal. 16├Ś. (b) Scanning electron fractograph of copper fracture showing dimpled appearance of typical More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005595
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... have been developed, with explosive welding being the most studied. Solid-state welds require clean surfaces; in explosive welding, the impact of the materials achieves this by removing the surface oxide layers. Explosive welding is well suited for welding dissimilar and difficult-to-weld metals...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Aluminum-to-stainless weld accomplished with an explosion-bonded tubular transition joint. Aluminum and stainless steel are welded to the respective ends using conventional fusion-welding processes. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005127
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... and the workpiece. When very high velocities or pressures are needed, the explosive may be placed directly (or with a thin protective layer) on the workpiece. This is classified as a contact operation. One of the more common contact operations is in the explosive cladding of materials via solid-state impact welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005635
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... and explosion. adhesive bonding arc welding brazing compressed gas cutting electrical safety electromagnetic radiation electron beam welding explosion prevention explosion protection explosion welding fire prevention fire protection friction welding fumes gas high-frequency welding laser...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005590
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... process: electrical shock, fumes and gases, arc radiation, and fire and explosion. arc radiation automatic welding electrical shock filler metals fire and explosion fumes gas tungsten arc welding power supplies robotic welding safety precautions shielding gas torch construction tungsten...