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epoxy phenol Novolac resin

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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 7 Epoxy phenol novolac resin More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006077
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... Abstract This article provides a detailed discussion on the principal classes and curatives of epoxy resins used in the coatings industry. The principal classes are bisphenol A epoxy, bisphenol F epoxy, epoxy phenol novolac, cycloaliphatic epoxies, epoxy acrylate, brominated bisphenol-A-based...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006046
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
.... They are often described as nonreactive phenolics. In the corrosion-protection coatings industry, novolac resins are combined almost exclusively with epoxy resins to form highly cross-linked, highly chemical-resistant coating resins. The novolac resin is used most often in its epoxidized form but can also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003366
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... In the reaction of the phenol with the aldehyde, the catalyst used and the ratio of formaldehyde to phenol determines the type of resin produced. Phenolic resins based on an acid catalyst and formaldehyde-to-phenol (F/P) molar ratio of less than 0.9 to 1 are called novolacs, and those prepared from an alkaline...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003845
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
..., as indicated in Table 1 . Corrosion-resistant resins Table 1 Corrosion-resistant resins Family Types Polyester Isophthalic Terephthalic Bisphenol-A fumarate Chlorendic anhydride Epoxy Bisphenol-A Epoxy novolac Epoxy vinyl ester Bisphenol-A Epoxy novolac Furan...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003692
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... temperature and chemical resistance between Bis-A and novolacs Less flexible; requires thorough blast cleaning surface preparation Increasing use due to high reactivity and low VOC content Epoxy novolacs Greatest chemical resistance and highest temperature resistance of all epoxy resins used for most...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003362
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... reacted with epichlorohydrin to generate the epoxy. High epoxy resin functionality and high cured T g characterize these resins and differentiate them from the difunctional bisphenol- A/F resins. The phenol novolacs are high-viscosity liquids while cresol novolacs are typically solids at room...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003032
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... temperature for thermoset epoxy resin-matrix composites with graphite fiber reinforcements. Source: Ref 63 Epoxy Resin with and without Reinforcement Fibers, and Molding Compounds Epoxy resin characterization includes DGEBA, phenolic novolac, and aliphatic epoxies without fibers or fillers...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003447
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... are high-strength, medium-temperature resin systems that can be formulated into compounds, such as diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA); multifunctional epoxies, such as phenolic novolac; and aliphatic epoxies, such as cycloaliphatic. Temperatures up to 230 to 260 °C (450 to 500 °F) can be used...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003010
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... A (DGEBA) ( Fig. 10 ). This resin provides an excellent balance of physical, chemical, and electrical properties that makes it highly desirable in composite applications. The properties of commercial grades of BPA epoxy resins are shown in Table 9 . Epoxidized phenol novolacs, shown in Fig. 11 , are also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... to balance properties and produce expected results. BPA, bisphenol A Bisphenol A Epoxy While there are other epoxy materials used in functional coatings, the workhorse is bisphenol A epoxy resin ( Ref 6 ). Epoxy Novolacs Epoxy novolacs are multifunctional epoxies based on phenolic...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005242
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
...) and the phenolic (novolac) of the shell process (see the article “Shell Molding and Shell Coremaking” in this Volume). Rammed graphite for casting highly reactive metals such as titanium or zirconium Of these, the three most important sand molding methods are shell molding, no-bake molding (phenolic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003441
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... that of state-of-the-art epoxies and polyimides. Key property tests are listed in Table 4 . Phenolic Resins Phenolic resins are available commercially in a wide variety of types. The two main types are a single-stage resole and a two-stage novolac. The resole phenolic is the most widely used, because...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... as homopolymers or as copolymers with monomers such as styrene. Vinyl Ester Novolac Resins Epoxy novolacs (epoxy resins based on phenol formaldehyde novolacs) used for the epoxy resin backbone can be utilized to formulate specialty vinyl ester resins. Heat-deflection points of 132 to 149 °C (270 to 300 °F...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006051
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
.... Better temperature and chemical resistance than bis-A types. Intermediate temperature and chemical resistance between bis-A and novolacs Less flexible; requires thorough blast-cleaning surface preparation Increasing use due to high reactivity and low VOC content Epoxy novolacs Greater chemical...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003367
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
.... In many of the most-demanding applications, CE resins have replaced epoxy novolac systems. The primary reasons are their high T g (>220 °C or 430 °F), low dielectric properties, very low chloride levels, low moisture absorption, and their ability to be formulated to meet UL 94 flammability...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002465
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... at 315 to 760 °C (600 to 1400 °F). Resin matrix carbon retention for carbon matrix conversion at 760 °C (1400 °F) is 55% for phenolic, 17% for polyester, and 10% for epoxy (novolac). Fiber strength does not degrade significantly until the following temperatures are reached: Fiber Temperature °C...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006029
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... and the subsequent reaction with epoxy resins have been shown to produce copolymers with improved water and moisture resistance ( Ref 18 , 19 ). The formulator must balance the desired property improvements with the cold-blend compatibility between the epoxy resin and the siloxane. Novolac and bisphenol A epoxies...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003360
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... continuous-use temperature of 205 to 230 °C (400 to 450 °F). Temperature spikes up to 290 °C (550 °F) can be tolerated by some formulations based on epoxy novolacs. The amine-cured epoxy resins are also affected by water. Because of the hydroxyl groups generated during cure, water is absorbed readily...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006035
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
..., novolac epoxy, vinyl, vinyl ester, and glass flake polyester have been used in these applications. Typically the surfaces to be lined are cleaned to remove soluble salt contamination, prepared in accordance with Ref 17 , and then coated and cured in a manner designed to avoid future problems from osmotic...