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electroslag welding

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005591
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract Electroslag welding (ESW) involves high energy input relative to other welding processes, resulting generally in inferior mechanical properties and specifically in lower toughness of the heat-affected zone. Electrogas welding (EGW) is a method of gas metal or flux cored arc welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001371
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Electroslag welding (ESW) and electrogas welding (EGW) are two related procedures that are used to weld thick-section materials in the vertical or near-vertical position between retaining shoes. This article discusses the fundamentals of the electroslag process in terms of heat flow...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 Wire spacing diagram for multiple-electrode electroslag welding incorporating oscillation for better energy distribution across the thickness of the weldment. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 10 Operating parameter window for electroslag welding. Boundary A represents the voltage threshold for parent plate fusion at low-power inputs. Boundary B represents the constitutive equation for adequate penetration at high power levels. Boundary C represents the maximum power output More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 11 Selected electrodes and guides (nozzles) used in electroslag welding. (a) Single flux-covered tube. (b) Cluster of rods taped together. (c) Flux-covered wing nozzle. (d) Flux-covered wing or web nozzle with two tubes More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 14 Schematic of electroslag welding process using separate filler wire to increase deposition rate and absorb excess thermal energy in molten metal bath. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 16 Application of electroslag welding to incorporate penetrating members such as nozzles onto thick-wall pressure vessels. Source: Ref 39 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 6 Wire spacing diagram for multiple-electrode electroslag welding incorporating oscillation for better energy distribution across the thickness of the weldment. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 10 Operating parameter window for electroslag welding. Boundary A represents the voltage threshold for parent plate fusion at low power inputs. Boundary B represents the constitutive equation for adequate penetration at high power levels. Boundary C represents the maximum power output More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 15 Selected electrodes and guides (nozzles) used in electroslag welding. (a) Single flux-covered tube. (b) Cluster of rods taped together. (c) Flux-covered wing nozzle. (d) Flux-covered wing or web nozzle with two tubes More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 18 Schematic of electroslag welding process using separate filler wire to increase deposition rate and absorb excess thermal energy in molten metal bath. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 22 Application of electroslag welding to incorporate penetrating members such as nozzles onto thick-wall pressure vessels. Source: Ref 38 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 10 Schematic illustration of the electroslag welding process used for heavy deposition welding in position or in a vertical plane using special tooling (as shown). Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Typical thermal cycle of an electroslag weld relative to that of an arc welded weld More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 5 Isometric three-dimensional temperature distribution in an electroslag weldment allowing improved visualization of the temperature profile. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 12 Electroslag weld metal solidification structure according to the variation of the orientation and the thickness of the columnar grains zone. (a) Group 1. (b) Group 2. (c) Group 3. (d) Group 4. See text for details. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Typical thermal cycle of an electroslag weld bath relative to that of an arc welding pool More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 5 Isometric three-dimensional temperature distribution in an electroslag weldment allowing improved visualization of the temperature profile. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 16 Electroslag weld-metal solidification structure according to the variation of the orientation and the thickness of the columnar grains zone. (a) Group 1. (b) Group 2. (c) Group 3. (d) Group 4. See text for details. Source: Ref 3 More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003509
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... welding processes. The article also describes failure origins in other welding processes, such as electroslag welds, electrogas welds, flash welds, upset butt welds, flash welds, electron and laser beam weld, and high-frequency induction welds. arc welding brittle fracture electrogas welds...