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electron beam welds

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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 8 Electron-beam welds showing flaws that can occur in poor welds and the absence of flaws in a good weld with reinforcement More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005615
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
...Abstract Abstract This article introduces the operating principles and modes of operation for high-vacuum (EBW-HV), Medium-vacuum (EBW-MV), and nonvacuum (EBW-NV) electron beam welding. Equipment, process sequence, part preparation, process control, and weld geometry are described for electron...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001369
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...Abstract Abstract Electron-beam welding (EBW) is a high-energy density fusion process that is accomplished by bombarding the joint to be welded with an intense (strongly focused) beam of electrons that have been accelerated up to velocities 0.3 to 0.7 times the speed of light at 25 to 200 kV...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005614
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
...Abstract Abstract Electron beam welding (EBW) can produce deep, narrow, and almost parallel-sided welds with low total heat input and relatively narrow heat-affected zones in a wide variety of common and exotic metals. This article focuses on essential parameters of EBW, namely, weld...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 Types of butt joints and welds typically generated by electron beam welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 10 Types of corner joints and welds typically obtained with electron beam welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 11 Typical welds produced by electron beam welding of T-joints More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 12 Typical welds obtained by electron beam welding of lap joints More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 13 Typical welds generated by electron beam welding of edge joints having components of equal and unequal section thicknesses More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 8 Tiered welds made simultaneously using the electron beam welding process. Source: Ref 12 Joint type Circumferential, two-tier butt Weld type Square groove Machine capacity 150 kV at 40 mA Gun type Fixed Maximum vacuum 1.3 ×10 −3 Pa (10 −5 torr) Fixtures More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001444
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...Abstract Abstract Electron-beam welding (EBW) can produce deep, narrow, and almost parallel-sided welds with low total heat input and relatively narrow heat-affected zones in a wide variety of common and exotic metals. This article discusses the joint configurations and shrinkage stresses...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 5 Plot of electron beam weld pool ratio ( d / w ) versus electron beam power density for low-sulfur (20 ppm) and high-sulfur (>120 ppm) type 304L stainless steel. Keyhole formation begins at approximately 2 × 10 3 W/mm 2 . More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 16 Schematic illustrations of the (a) electron beam welding and (b) laser beam welding processes. The former is virtually always operated in a hard vacuum, while the latter can operate in air, in an inert gas atmosphere, or in vacuum. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 15 Joint location and beam clearance for an electron beam welded butt joint near a projecting corner, T, or shoulder consisting of magnetic work metal More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 3 Cross sections of electron beam welding using high-voltage welding equipment. (a) Shallow-penetration weld on 304L stainless steel with weld parameters of 100 kV, 10 mA, and a travel speed of 17 mm/s (0.7 in./s). Courtesy of T.A. Palmer, Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania tate More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 2 Weld and HAZ in electron-beam welded TZM; arrows indicate fusion line. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 15 Micrograph of transverse section of an electron-beam welded butt weld joining 2.5 mm (0.100 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V sheet using a 0.127 mm (0.005 in.) thick tantalum shim placed in the joint. Kroll's reagent was used as etchant. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 8 Solidification crack in electron-beam weld along weld center in region where solidification occurred as primary austenite as a result of higher solidification and cooling rates More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 22 Master curves for prediction of penetration depth during electron beam welding. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 Example of epitaxial growth from the fusion line in an electron beam weld of alloy C103. Original magnification: 400×. Source: Ref 5 More