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electron beam powder-bed fusion

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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 30 Schematic illustrating the electron beam powder-bed fusion process More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 37 Pure copper inductors produced by (a) electron beam powder-bed fusion (courtesy of GH Inductor Group) and (b) laser powder-bed fusion using frequency-doubled neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers at the ~515 nm wavelength (courtesy of Trumpf) More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 54 Partial pressures of water vapor during electron beam powder-bed fusion (EB-PBF) melting for hydrogen-heat-treated and untreated copper powders shown in Fig. 53 . The baseline layerwise H 2 O cycle is evident in both cases due to adsorbed water vapor on powder but is 2 orders More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 3 Schematic of electron beam powder-bed fusion, also commonly known as selective electron beam melting. Reprinted from Ref 11 with permission from Wiley More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 5 (a) Schematic of an electron beam powder-bed fusion (EB-PBF)-fabricated Ti-6V-4Al product in which unmelted powder remains; photograph shows the residual powder after heat treatment. (b) Stress-strain curves of products with and without heat treatment that caused necked powders More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 6 Porous products fabricated by electron beam powder-bed fusion with various-sized unidirectional pores More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006579
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... processes include binder jetting, ultrasonic additive manufacturing, directed-energy deposition, laser powder-bed fusion, and electron beam powder-bed fusion. The article presents a review of the literature and state of the art for copper alloy AM and features data on AM processes and industrial practices...
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 7 Diagrams representing two different additive manufacturing processes. (a) Laser powder-bed fusion. (b) Electron-beam powder-bed fusion More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 57 Reported room-temperature and high-temperature fatigue properties of GRCop-84 for electron beam powder-bed fusion (EB-PBF) and laser powder-bed fusion (LPBF) compared to standard hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and extruded material More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 7 Particle size distribution from typical vacuum inert gas atomized production, showing the relative ranges typically used in different additive manufacturing modalities: binder jet, laser powder-bed fusion (L-PBF), electron beam powder-bed fusion (EB-PBF), and directed-energy deposition More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 4 Representative microstructures of copper produced with various additive manufacturing processes. Note that scale bars vary. (a) Laser powder-bed fusion, 98.7% relative density, 800 ppm oxygen. Source: Ref 26 . (b) Electron beam powder-bed fusion, 99.95% relative density, 50 ppm oxygen More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 43 Oxygen content of copper powder atomized from oxygen-free electronic copper bar, screened in air and argon to a 15 to 53 μm distribution. The data show the pickup of oxygen from the powder manufacturer to the first and tenth runs using electron beam powder-bed fusion. The oxygen More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 34 (a) Oxygen-free electronic copper klystron cavity. (b) Cross section of an x-band-coupled-cavity traveling wave tube fabricated with electron beam powder-bed fusion More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 6 Microstructures of GR-Cop84. (a) Conventionally processed and prior to heat treatment. (b) Fabricated with electron beam powder-bed fusion. Source: Ref 97 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 5 Defect elimination by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) for Ti-6Al-4V produced by using electron beam powder-bed fusion. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 59 Comparison of ultimate tensile strength from electron beam powder-bed fusion (EB-PBF) to extruded and hot isostatic pressed (HIP) GRCop-84 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 6 Fatigue data for Ti-6Al-4V produced by using electron beam powder-bed fusion in different variants. HIP, hot isostatic pressed. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 13 Introduction of uniaxially aligned grooves on the surface by electron beam powder-bed fusion and the uniaxial alignment of osteoblasts, which was confirmed by actin, an element of the cytoskeleton, and vinculin in focal adhesions More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 36 Copper accelerating cavity with internal cooling channels fabricated with electron beam powder-bed fusion. Courtesy of Radiabeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA, and University of Texas at El Paso More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 40 Scanning electron microscopy images of copper with (a) 600 ppm and (b) 50 ppm oxygen produced by using electron beam powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing and subjected to a hydrogen brazing cycle at 970 °C (1780 °F) for 1 h and 101 kPa (1 atm) of pure hydrogen. The image More