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electrocleaning

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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 2 Anodic electrocleaning. Four electrons are discharged by four hydroxyl (OH) − ions at the anode, or workpiece, to liberate one molecule of oxygen (O 2 ). More
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Cathodic electrocleaning. Reaction of electrons with positively charged hydrogen ions results in liberation of hydrogen gas. More
Image
Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 3 Equipment for localized electrocleaning of heat tint from the surface of stainless steel. Source: Ref 5 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001315
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
...), electrocleaning, acid dipping, and zinc conversion coating treatments. acid dipping alkaline cleaning brushing buffing coating coating adherence controlled shot peening conversion coatings corrosion resistance electrocleaning emulsion cleaning mechanical finishing parting lines finishing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001305
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
..., and buffing, are reviewed. The article also explains the procedures of electrocleaning, electropolishing, electroplating, painting, surface blackening, coloring, terne coatings, and thermal spraying. It includes useful information on the surface modification of stainless steels, namely, ion implantation...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003213
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... wipe Surfactant alkaline (agitated soak), rinse Emulsion soak, rinse Solvent wipe Surfactant alkaline (agitated soak), rinse Emulsion soak, rinse Solvent wipe Surfactant alkaline (agitated soak), rinse, electroclean (i) Alkaline spray Continuous high production Seldom required Surfactant...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
..., the selection of a cleaning procedure depends greatly on the degree of cleanliness required and subsequent operations to be performed. Abrasive blasting produces the lowest degree of cleanliness. Solvent, solvent vapor degrease, emulsion soak, alkaline soak, alkaline electroclean, alkaline plus acid cleaning...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001269
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
.... In anodic electrocleaning, the strip is positively charged and oxygen is discharged at the strip surface to create a mechanical scrubbing action. One disadvantage of anodic cleaning is the tendency to build up sludge on the electrodes. In cathodic electrocleaning, the strip is negatively charged, producing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001264
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... and preparation steps prior to plating. Procedures for cleaning and preparation for electroless nickel plating are generally the same as those for electroplating. One exception is that electrocleaners sometimes cannot be used because of fixturing restraints, making soak cleaning more critical. See the section...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001262
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... pulsed current include gold and gold alloys, nickel, silver, chromium, tin-lead alloys, and palladium. Pulsed current is also used for anodizing and, in select cases, for etching, electrocleaning, and electroforming. Advantages The advantages of pulse plating vary from one application to the next...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005777
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... approximately 508 mm (20 in.) ( Ref 6 ). The recommended minimum spray pressure is 0.10 MPa (0.015 ksi). Larger parts can be cleaned more effectively by spraying. Energy-saving, low-temperature, solventized alkaline cleaners are available for soak cleaning. Similarly, low-temperature electrocleaners...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002494
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... chemicals or prevent satisfactory rinsing Provide good natural drainage or use drainage holes on nonsignificant surfaces to minimize carryover Avoid features that could trap air and prevent surface chemical reactions from occurring or cause staining Mask areas not to be attacked Electrocleaning...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003833
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... Process description Anodic electroclean, cold water rinses, immersion in 5% sulfuric acid at room temperature for 15 s, cold water rinses Anodic electroclean, cold water rinses, anodic etch in bath for 1 min at 60 A/dm 2 Surface roughness after plating   R a , μm (mil) 0.53 (0.02) 0.18 (0.007...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006504
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Electrocleaning Electrocleaning is seldom used for cleaning aluminum and aluminum alloys, because it offers no advantage over an etching cleaner. However, a few processes are used in production operations. These use low voltage, usually in the range of 6 to 12 V. Cathodic cleaning, in which the work...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001261
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... typically involves precleaning, electrocleaning, and electroetching; some base materials also require desmutting, activation, and preplate operations. Parts with heavy corrosion, lubricants, oil, and so on ordinarily require more aggressive cleaning, such as vapor/solvent degreasing or grit blasting, prior...
Book Chapter

By A. Sato
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001248
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001304
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
...), rinse Emulsion soak, rinse Solvent wipe Surfactant alkaline (agitated soak), rinse electroclean (i) Continuous high production Seldom required Surfactant alkaline spray, spray rinse Agitated soak or spray, rinse (j) Surfactant alkaline spray, spray rinse Emulsion spray, rinse Surfactant...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001224
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... by 100 mm (4 by 4 in.) Drawing compound Clean, blow off 2 Assembly, storage Diphase emulsion, dip cleaning Brass or zinc die castings Buffing dirt Soak, spray, electroclean, acid pickle 4 Wash, then plate (a) Emulsion does not plug holes of the needle valves and does not interfere...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001309
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... exposes a more active surface for electroplating, and the light tarnish formed is readily dissolved by a mild hydrochloric or sulfuric acid solution. Current density during anodic electrocleaning of brass should be about 3 A/dm 2 (30 A/ft 2 ) at 3 to 4 V. Use of high currents will etch the brass...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... min Borax 22–38 g (3–5 oz) Sodium pyrophosphate 4–8 g (0.5–1 oz) Water, to make 4 L (1 gal) Temperature of bath 60–70 °C (140–160 °F) Immersion time 2–5 min Electrocleaning Electrocleaning is seldom used for cleaning aluminum and aluminum alloys, because it offers...