1-20 of 243 Search Results for

elastomers

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter

By Rebecca Tuszynski
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003011
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract This article discusses the properties, chemical structures, and applications of different types of elastomers grouped based on their resistance to aging (oxidative degradation), solvents, and temperature. These include butadiene rubber, natural rubber, isoprene rubber, chloroprene...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003012
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract Additives for plastics and elastomers are used to increase the ease of processing and to improve the properties of the final product. Additives improve processing characteristics by increasing lubricity and by stabilizing the polymer. Additives that improve properties include those...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003848
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... Abstract Elastomers belong to a group of materials known as polymers that acquire their properties and strength from their molecular weight, chain entanglements, and crystalline regions. This article focuses on the use of elastomers as seals and describes its performance capabilities from...
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 9 Guidance for use of plastics and elastomers in hydrofluoric acid (HF). Regions below and left of lines are suitable in uncontaminated HF. The down arrows (↓) are the upper limit of acid concentration for the material. (a) Vapor only. Materials: 1, PTFE, perfluoroalkoxy (PFA); 2 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Thermoplastic elastomers are long-chain polymers that form from regions where polymer chains line up and crystallize. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 2 Thermoset elastomers are long-chain polymers connected by cross links represented by circled Xs. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 4 Elastomers may be cured in one or two stages. The stages proceed from top to bottom. (a) Polymer chains are not connected. (b) Heat drives the chemistry of cure. Many cross links are formed. Some polymer chains are well connected. Elastomeric properties are created. (c) Higher More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Typical temperature capability comparison for various elastomers that is valid for dry air. Consult manufacturers for the duration of extended temperature range. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Chemical resistance of elastomers in 95% sulfuric acid measured by swell, showing influence of temperature during 2 month exposure More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 8 Property changes of three elastomers in ethylene oxide at 50 °C (122 °F), 672 h test per ASTM D 471 and D 412, WT, weight; VOL, volume; HD, hardness; Tb, tensile strength at break; M100, tensile modulus at 100 s, 20 °C (68 °F); Eb, elongation at break More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 11 Permeation rate of elastomers used for handling fuels. Fuel C at 23 °C (73 °F) tested. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Classification of the processes of friction leading to wear for elastomers (adapted after Moore, Ref 23 ). The diagram clarifies the role of friction in determining the wear mechanism for elastomeric polymers. More
Image
Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 5 Classification of the processes of friction leading to wear for elastomers. The diagram clarifies the role of friction in determining the wear mechanism for elastomeric polymers. Adapted from Ref 22 More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 19 Effect of moisture on elastomer density More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Elastomer architecture shown by structured chemical formula. Structure has a strong influence on chemical resistance. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Typical stress-strain curve for a fiber, a plastic, and an elastomer More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Waves of detachment when an elastomer is slid against a hard and smooth surface. The rubber moves forward in the form of ripples of wave on its contact surface with a smooth and hard counterface. These so-called waves of detachment can produce wear in the form of rolls of detached More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Damage created on the surface of an elastomer by isolated stress concentration. (a) Surface deformation pattern when a sharp needle or conical indentor with acute angle is slid on the surface of an elastomer. The elastomer surface is pulled in the direction of motion and fails More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 2 Morphology of a styrene-butadiene thermoplastics elastomer. Source: Ref 10 More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 3 Effect of cross link density on elastomer properties. Source: Ref 19 More