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dynamic recrystallization

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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Dynamic restoration. (a) Dynamic recovery. (b) Dynamic recrystallization More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 6 (a) Stress-strain diagram of dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) flow curves. The critical strain, ε c , and peak strain, ε p , are identified. The amount of softening attributable to DRX is defined as σ recov − σ. The fractional softening X is then given More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Progress of dynamic recrystallization when the recrystallized grain size is much smaller than the original grain size. Symbols are defined in Fig. 2(b) . Shading of grains darkens with increasing dislocation density. In (e), the fourth stage of the cascade includes new grains More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 2 Discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) in an initially rained nickel-base superalloy. (a) Initial stage of DDRX and (b) nearly fully recrystallized microstructure More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 11 Cellular-automata predictions for dynamic recrystallization. (a) Microstructure evolution and (b) stress-strain curves at various strain rates. Source: Ref 29 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 30 Discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) in an initially coarse-grained nickel-base superalloy. (a) Initial stage of DDRX. (b) Nearly fully recrystallized microstructure More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12 Schematic representation of a continuous dynamic recrystallization microstructure made up of an aggregate of crystallites. High- and low-angle grain boundaries are represented with thick and fine lines, respectively. More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 13 Cellular automata results for discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DRX). (a) Initial structure. (b) Necklace structure formed by partial dynamic ion of (a). (c) Partial dynamic recrystallization of an ingot structure with particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN). GB, grain boundary More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 60 Dynamically recrystallized grain sizes of copper and nickel as a function of the Zener-Hollomon parameter ( Z ). Source: Ref 126 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Dynamically recrystallized grain size. Predicted grain size ranges from ASTM 3.5 at the center to 7.0 near the edge, several millimeters beneath the surface. The 1s indicate regions of the original coarse grain size (low ASTM grain size number), while the 2s indicate fine grain size More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 10 Volume fraction of dynamically recrystallized grains. The 1's indicate regions of small volume fraction of recrystallized grains, while the 2's indicate regions of a larger volume fraction. Dark regions indicate intermediate fractions in accordance with the legend scale. Original scale More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005403
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Abstract Recrystallization is to a large extent responsible for their final mechanical properties. This article commences with a discussion on static recrystallization (SRX) and dynamic recrystallization (DRX). The DRX includes continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) and discontinuous...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004019
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... and abnormal or discontinuous grain growth. It also examines the key mechanisms that control microstructure evolution during hot working and subsequent heat treatment. These include dynamic recovery, dynamic recrystallization, metadynamic recrystallization, static recovery, static recrystallization, and grain...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005432
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Abstract This article examines how cellular automaton (CA) can be applied to the simulation of static and dynamic recrystallization. It describes the steps involved in the CA simulation of recrystallization. These include defining the CA framework, generating the initial microstructure...
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 18 Schematic illustration of work-hardening behavior for a material undergoing dynamic recrystallization at hot working temperatures. (a) Stress-strain curve. (b) Corresponding plot of d σ ¯ / d ε ¯ as a function of stress, σ ¯ . DRV, dynamic recovery; DDRX More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009002
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... working and key processes that control microstructure evolution: dynamic recovery, static recovery, recrystallization, and grain growth. Some of the key phenomenological descriptions of plastic flow and microstructure evolution are also summarized. The article concludes with a discussion on the modeling...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Typical deformation-processing map for austenitic stainless steel, showings regions of ductile fracture, wedge cracking, dynamic recrystallization, and “safe” forming. Note that the boundaries for safe forming (i.e., the loci of processing conditions between ductile fracture and wedge More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005459
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... in this section. Recrystallization Mechanisms Deformation at high temperature, usually at and above 70% of the melting point (on the absolute temperature scale), triggers a marked transformation of microstructure called recrystallization. When it happens during deformation, it is called dynamic...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Regions of restoration processes (recovery and recrystallization) under various thermomechanical conditions. (a) Rolling with a thickness strain of 50% results in static and dynamic recovery, although static recrystallization occurs in materials with a high stacking-fault energy. (b More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003995
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... processes (recovery and recrystallization) under various thermomechanical conditions. (a) Rolling with a thickness strain of 50% results in static and dynamic recovery, although static recrystallization occurs in materials with a high stacking-fault energy. (b) Extrusion at a high reduction strain of 99...