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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 5 Anodic coatings are cationic, and dyes used for anodizing are anionic. The difference in the charge allows for the dye to adsorb into the anodic coating. The difference in the solubility of the dye in the aqueous dye solution and in the anodic coating also contributes to dye adsorption. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 31 Cracks revealed by visible dye penetrant testing in a 304L composite floor tube. Note also the cracking along the tube/membrane interface and in the membrane. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 33 Cracks revealed by visible dye penetrant testing on 304L and weld overlay (WO) 625 composite tubes that form primary air-port openings. (a) Craze cracks on 304L. (b) Membrane cracks on WO625. (c), Circumferential cracks on 304L. (d) Tube-membrane weld cracks on WO625 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 34 Fluorescent dye penetrant examination showing linear indications of stress-corrosion cracking in an 18Mn-5Cr retaining ring. See the article “Corrosion of Generators” in this Volume. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Fluorescent dye penetrant examination showing linear indications of stress-corrosion cracking in an 18Mn-5Cr retaining ring More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Example of fault tree chart for forgings with dye-penetrant defects More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Example of corrective action tree for forgings with dye-penetrant defects. LIMCA, liquid metal cleanness analyzer device More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 4 Samples indicating the effects of black dye bleed in a cold seal. Samples A and C used pH-adjusting solution 1 at 2 and 5 g/L, respectively, to increase pH. In contrast, samples B and D used pH-adjusting solution 2 to increase pH at 2 and 5 g/L, respectively. More dye bleed occurred More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 4 Circles represent dye molecules that are adhering to the anodic coating and that subsequently move into the pores. Adapted from Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 1 Use of articulated mirror to check a weld after dye penetrant inspection. Courtesy of A. Antonatos More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 2 Use of articulated mirror to check a crack inside a bore after dye penetrant inspection. Courtesy of A. Antonatos More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Surface cracks in a flux-cored arc weld highlighted by dye penetrant inspection More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 5 Fluorescent dye penetrant indication of fissures in a carburized UNS G86200 steel worm gear after grinding, revealed under ultraviolet light. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 26 Solder crack after dye-and-pry processing More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 23 Center crack observed in billet due to poor grain refinement. Dye penetrant (Zyglo) was used. 1×. Courtesy of Marlene Reisinger, Eastalco More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 4 Example of Fault Tree chart for forgings with dye-penetrant defects More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 8 Example of Corrective Action Tree (CAT) for forgings with dye-penetrant defects. LIMCA is a liquid metal cleanliness analyzer. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 Example of Corrective Action Assessment (CAA) chart for forgings with dye-penetrant defects. LIMCA is a liquid metal cleanliness analyzer. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 10 Example of Technical Plan for Evaluation (TPE) chart for forgings with dye-penetrant defects More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 11 Example of Corrective Action Tree (CAT) chart for forgings with dye-penetrant defects. LIMCA is a liquid metal cleanliness analyzer. More