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diamond grinding

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Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 6 Diamond grinding application range as a function of diamond abrasive grain size More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 11 Production grinding applications of diamond grinding wheels More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 12 Production grinding applications of diamond grinding wheels More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006054
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article describes the secondary operations for cemented carbide parts, namely, diamond grinding, honing, electrical discharge machining, and brazing after sintering to achieve desired results, such as specified size, shape, edge condition, and surface finish. brazing...
Book Chapter

By K. Subramanian
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002152
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... Abstract Superabrasives collectively refer to the diamond and cubic boron nitride (CBN) abrasives used in grinding applications. This article discusses the classification of superabrasive wheels according to a variety of sizes and shapes, construction, concentration, and bond systems...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... and create new surfaces that define a shape. Such energy transfer is usually accomplished through the use of abrasives. Grinding methods used on ceramic components are the most versatile. They usually employ diamond abrasives that are held fixed in a grinding wheel and are applied against the work surface...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001106
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... boron nitride compounds are available in the form of grit and sintered polycrystalline blanks of various size, shape, and composition. The article explains how superabrasive grains made from these materials can be used in lapping, polishing, and grinding applications, and how diamond and boron nitride...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003791
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
...–5.6 200–300 Complementary Paper Water 800- (P2400-) grit SiC Fine grinding, 15–25 20–25 4.5–5.6 200–300 Complementary No/low-nap cloth Lapping oil or extending fluid 3–6 μm diamond Rough polishing, 120–300 20–30 4.5–6.7 100–150 Complementary Synthetic suede None Water (e...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001239
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... particles and their bonding material. The transient temperatures prevailing at the abrasive particle tip during grinding contribute significantly to wheel wear. For example, during grinding with diamond wheels, wheel wear can occur by thermally induced degradation of the bond holding the diamond abrasives...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003747
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Abstract This article illustrates how objective experiments and comparisons can be used to develop surface preparation procedures for metallographic examination of structural features of metals. These procedures are classified as machining, grinding and abrasion, or polishing. The article...
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 9 Commercially available diamond grains used in various applications. (a) Friable diamond grains especially tailored for resin bond grinding wheels. (b) Diamond grains tailored for use in metal bond grinding wheels. These grains are typically in the 80 to 400 mesh size (350 to 38 μm More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 11 Effects of various grinding and polishing stages on the specimen surface. (a) The rolling action of diamond particles on a hard lap surface during planar grinding produces a flat specimen with a minimal amount of damage to the coating. (b) During fine grinding, rotating the specimen More
Book Chapter

Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... of supporting the workpiece, and the method of restoring the cutting contour of the grinding wheel (diamond dressing or truing, or crush truing). Thread grinding machines are sometimes classified as external, internal, or universal. The universal type is capable of grinding both external and internal threads...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003532
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... the edge of the surface on the platen during grinding and polishing. This procedure can be used effectively with larger-diameter wheels, if the specimen holder diameter is large, relative to the platen. The use of “hard,” woven or nonwoven, napless surfaces for polishing with diamond abrasives (rather than...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002159
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... diamond core drill or milling tool In ultrasonic impact grinding, an abrasive slurry flows through a gap between the workpiece and the vibrating tool ( Fig. 1 ). Material removal occurs when the abrasive particles, suspended in the slurry, are struck on the downstroke of the vibrating tool...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0009073
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... grinding and polishing disks that can last through the production of thousands of specimens are available and becoming standard in most laboratories that process many samples. These diamond-coated disks, either continuous or discontinuous (patterned), are taking the place of the traditional silicon carbide...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002151
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... no standard of measurement. Fig. 1 Standard marking system for conventional aluminum oxide and silicon carbide abrasive grinding wheels Fig. 2 Standard marking system for diamond (a) and cubic boron nitride (b) superabrasive grinding wheels Abrasive Type and Grit Size In both...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003598
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... number). The diamond wheel, with either metal bond or resin bond, is used for grinding heat treated steels with hardness ≥60 HRC, carbides, and stellite. It is sometimes recommended that the diamond grit ( Ref 4 ) should be blocky, to burnish the oxide residue from the workpiece, rather than sharp...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
..., napless surfaces for polishing with diamond abrasives (rather than softer cloths, such as canvas, billiard, and felt) maintains flatness. Rigid grinding discs (RGDs) yield surfaces with exceptional flatness. Final polishing with low-nap cloths for short times introduces very little rounding, compared...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... for conventional abrasives and ANSI B74.3-1986 for superabrasives), many parts of the marking system have no standard of measurement. Fig. 1 Standard marking system for conventional aluminum oxide and silicon carbide abrasive grinding wheels Fig. 2 Standard marking system for (a) diamond and (b...