1-20 of 98 Search Results for

diamond abrasives

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001320
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... crystalline Al 2 O 3 obtained in CVD. PVD TiAlN coatings are also chemically stable and offer the potential for high-speed machining of steels. Diamond-coated tools are suitable for machining nonferrous alloys containing abrasive second-phase particles (e.g., aluminum-silicon alloys) as well as for machining...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001232
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... capabilities, and overall drilling efficiency. Rotary ultrasonic machining uses a diamond-plated drill and is water cooled because the diamond-impregnated abrasive provides the cutting edge. Rotary ultrasonic machining can be used for milling, drilling, threading, and grinding applications. However, its use...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003218
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) involves the formation of a coating by the reaction of the coating substance with the substrate. Serving as an introduction to CVD, the article provides information on metals, ceramics, and diamond films formed by the CVD process. It further discusses...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003188
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., cermets, ceramics, cubic boron nitride, and polycrystalline diamond. It compares the toughness, and wear resistance for these cutting tool materials. Finally, the article explains the steps for selecting tool material grades for specific application. cemented carbides ceramics cermets cobalt-base...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract This article provides crystallographic and engineering data for single oxide ceramics, zirconia, silicates, mullite, spinels, perovskites, borides, carbides, silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon-nitride ceramics, diamond, and graphite. It includes data on crystal...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006790
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... diamond or tungsten carbide inserts in a steel matrix), the individual components of which vary in their mechanical properties. Under some abrasive wear conditions, removal of the softer phase (usually the matrix) can occur by one or more of the previously mentioned mechanisms. This process then leaves...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... are identified in the standard marking system for conventional abrasive products (aluminum oxide or silicon carbide abrasives) in Fig. 1 . Figure 2 shows the standard marking system for superabrasive products (diamond or cubic boron nitride). Although standard marking systems are available (ANSI...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003976
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... the distinct advantage of being machinable: it can be bored, drilled, and turned with carbide tools. Dies that require greater wear resistance and that are subjected to less shock are made with 13 to 16% Co binder. These grades must be ground or lapped with diamond. Carbide dies are usually of the...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... surfaces that define a shape. Such energy transfer is usually accomplished through the use of abrasives. Grinding methods used on ceramic components are the most versatile. They usually employ diamond abrasives that are held fixed in a grinding wheel and are applied against the work surface in a variety of...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005677
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... materials are routinely reshaped and smoothened using special instruments for cutting and finishing. A highly polished surface is then produced by treatment with polishing pastes containing alumina or diamond abrasive particles less than 1 μm in size. In a single-pass sliding technique, fluorapatite...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003194
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... for maximum linear tool motion (0.0005–0.0025 in. at end of tool) at 30 ft/s Toolholder material: Monel or stainless steel Tool material: Cold rolled steel or stainless steel Power ranges: 50–2400 watts Abrasive: Usually boron carbide or silicon carbide; also aluminum oxide; diamond dust has been used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... abrasives such as SiC, diamond, and alumina are commonly used in the preparation sequence. For ceramics, initial sectioning and grinding are accomplished with diamond abrasives; however, for the fine grinding steps, either diamond or softer mechanochemical abrasives (colloidal silica) are used. Nearly all...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003042
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... problems, graphite causes excessive wear on cutting tools because it is abrasive. To minimize this effect, cutting tools made of C-2 tungsten carbide or diamond can be used but require a precise coordination of feed rates and speed to achieve high productivity and quality parts. Most composite structures...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003214
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... lapping hardened steel or cast iron. Fused alumina is used for lapping soft steels or nonferrous metals. Diamond and natural abrasives are also sometimes used. Surface finishes in the range of 0.40 to 0.05 μm (16 to 2 μin.) R a are produced by lapping. Items to be electropolished are placed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003838
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... be combined with cobalt to make a high-hardness, wear-resistant, strong material. This material was initially used in dies for drawing tungsten filament wires instead of expensive diamond dies. Fig. 1 Microstructures of WC-Co (a, c, and e) and WC-TaC-TiC-Co (b, d, and f) cemented carbides. In a...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001239
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... particles and their bonding material. The transient temperatures prevailing at the abrasive particle tip during grinding contribute significantly to wheel wear. For example, during grinding with diamond wheels, wheel wear can occur by thermally induced degradation of the bond holding the diamond abrasives...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003244
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., such as disturbed metal, pitting, dragging out of inclusion, “comet tailing,” and staining. Polishing usually is conducted in several stages. Rough polishing generally is traditionally done with 6 or 3 μm diamond abrasive charged onto napless or low-nap cloths. Hard materials, such as through-hardened...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... is designed to make very precise cuts. They are smaller in size than the usual laboratory abrasive cutoff saw and use much smaller blades, typically from 7.6 to 20.3 cm (3 to 8 in.) in diameter. These blades can be of the nonconsumable type, made of copper-base alloys with diamond or cubic boron...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003245
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... yields a fully retained nodule. Note that the graphite spherulite has been well preserved. As polished, not etched. 800× For cast iron, polishing with diamond abrasives has been found to be most satisfactory. Polishing in two stages is recommended. Coarse polishing frequently is performed with 6...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003247
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... removed, can obscure the true structure of the specimen being examined. In the traditional method, preparation entails grinding with 400 grit SiC abrasive, rough polishing with 9 μm diamond paste on a napless cloth and 0.3 μm Al 2 O 3 slurry on a medium-nap cloth, and final polishing with colloidal...