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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006360
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... Abstract This article describes two variations of carbon-base coatings: diamondlike carbon (DLC) coatings and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) coatings. It discusses the basics of a few deposition methods as they apply to industrially relevant coatings. The methods include deposition of tungsten...
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 17 Diamond-impregnated wires Wire size Diamond size, μm Kerf size mm in. mm in. 0.08 0.003 8 0.08 0.00325 0.13 0.005 20 0.14 0.0055 0.2 0.008 45 0.23 0.009 0.25 0.010 60 0.29 0.0115 0.3 0.012 60 0.34 0.0135 0.38 0.015 60 0.42 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 6 Diamond grinding application range as a function of diamond abrasive grain size More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 7 Microstructure of sintered polycrystalline diamond. (a) Diamond with second phase at the grain boundaries. 225×. (b) Detailed structure of diamond-to-diamond bonding at grain boundary More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 1 Crystal structures of two forms of carbon. (a) The structure of diamond results when each carbon atom bonds to four of its neighbors in a tetrahedral arrangement within a cubic unit cell. The C-C bond length is approximately 1.54 Å. (b) The crystal structure of graphite is described More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 31 Effect of cold work and aging on diamond pyramid hardness of A-286 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9 Low-speed cutoff machine. The specimen is fed into the diamond wafering blade by the force exerted by a deadweight. The blade rotation is fixed at 500 rpm. Courtesy of Buehler Ltd. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 26 Fixed-diamond abrasive disc. Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 38 Tungsten carbide/cobalt coating prepared with high-napped cloth, diamond abrasive, and water-based lubricant. Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 39 Tungsten carbide/cobalt coating prepared with high-napped cloth, diamond abrasive, and oil-based lubricant. Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 40 Fine tungsten carbide/cobalt coating prepared using diamond. Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 43 Fine tungsten carbide/cobalt coating polished with 1 μm diamond suspension on a napless cloth at 150 rpm, 35 kPa (5 psi) per 32 mm (1 1 4 in.) mount for 2 min. Note that the apparent pores are associated with carbide or near-carbide fracturing. Original magnification: 500× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1 Schematic of the square-based diamond pyramid indenter used for the Vickers hardness test, and an example of the indentation it produces More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 19 Cutting tool wear of polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools when turning aluminum metal-matrix composites at a cutting speed of 500 m/min (1640 ft/min). Nose radius: 0.8 mm (0.03 in.) More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 1 Polished aluminum tread sheet. Courtesy of Diamond Aluminum More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 45 Crystal structures of diamond, graphite, and C 60 (Buckyball). Source: Ref 159 , 160 More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 5 Mass loss vs. thickness for a range of coating materials. DLC, diamond-like carbon More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 21 Constant-life diagram from the diamond stent subcomponent fatigue testing where the various conditions of mean strain and strain amplitude are plotted. Conditions that survived the 10 7 cycle testing are shown as open symbols, whereas cyclic conditions that led to fracture at <10 7 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 4 Rockwell indenter. (a) Diamond-cone Brale indenter (show at about 2×). (b) Comparison of old and new U.S. diamond indenters. The angle of the new indenter remains at 120° but has a larger radius closer to the average ASTM specified value of 200 μm; the old indenter has a radius of 192 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 8 Schematic representation of the square-base pyramidal diamond indenter used in a Vickers hardness tester and the resulting indentation in the workpiece More