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dew-point corrosion

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004159
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of HCl at 0.4 and 7% water contents in the gas. Source: Ref 2 Fig. 3 Dew-point behavior of NO 2 at 0.7 and 4% water content in the gas. Source: Ref 3 Fig. 5 Fossil-fired power generation boiler showing areas susceptible to dew-point corrosion (black areas) Fig. 11...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004124
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... or SO 2 to form the sulfuric acid. Increasing the jacket temperature above the dew-point temperature prevents this form of corrosion. Abrasion may take place from the hard-particle products of mechanical wear, corrosion, and combustion. All fuels have a given ash content; heavy fuels tend to have...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... vol% H and 25 vol% N), H 2 -N 2 mixtures, and hydrogen, all with a low dew point (−40 to −55 °C, or −40 to −65 °F), and vacuum. Sintering temperatures range from 1120 to 1345 °C (2050 to 2450 °F)—higher sintering temperatures are used when improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... be minimized only by the use of a low-dew-point furnace atmosphere and rapid cooling from sintering temperature (see “Corrosion Resistance of Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels” in this Volume for further details). When sintering is carried out in a nitrogen-rich atmosphere such as dissociated ammonia...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
...) (a) At 889 kPa (129 psi). (b) Water equals 1 Table 3 Compositions of principal furnace atmosphere constituents Atmosphere AGA class Air-to-natural gas ratio Dew point Nominal composition, vol% Key ratios (a) °C °F Nitrogen Hydrogen Water Carbon monoxide Carbon dioxide...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003199
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... by partial or complete combustion of a gas-air mixture; water vapor may be removed to produce a desired dew point Class 200—Prepared Nitrogen Base. An exothermic base with carbon dioxide and water vapor removed Class 300—Endothermic Base. Formed by partial reaction of a mixture of fuel gas and air...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003835
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
..., bal Fe. (e) 16.3% Cr, 24.3% Ni, 7.7% Mo, 0.81% Si, 0.25% Si, bal Fe. Source: Ref 14 Table 15 Effect of binder/lubricant on the corrosion resistance of sintered 316L stainless steel in deaerated 1000 ppm Cl buffered with acetate at 30 °C (pH=5) The dew point of the gas atmospheres...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003105
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... of ferrous metals in air increases when the surface is moistened regularly, as occurs in locations where dew regularly forms at night. Corrosion by most nonaqueous media except liquid metals occurs most often by direct chemical action resulting in loss of metal (e.g., high-temperature oxidation in air...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001452
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... the dissociator must be extremely dry (preferably having a dew point of −60 °C, or −80 °F, or lower). To ensure a very low dew point, the atmosphere that comes from the dissociator is commonly processed by being passed through a molecular-sieve dryer. To avoid the oxidation of base metal and brazing filler metal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004160
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... gas dryer and filter. There is a higher probability of SCC damage occurring to 18Mn-5Cr rings during the shutdown process. If the coolant gas dew point is higher than the retaining-ring temperature, moisture will condense on the rings, which can lead to SCC ( Ref 3 ). Hydrogen coolers should...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005848
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... point, chemistry, and applicable brazing filler metals and base metals AWS brazing atmosphere Source Maximum dew point of incoming gas Composition of atmosphere, % Filler metals Base metals Remarks H 2 N 2 CO CO 2 1 Combusted fuel gas (low hydrogen) Room temperature 5–1 87...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... for Rebar Corrosion Protection,” Corrosion Protection of Concrete Reinforcement, American Society of Civil Engineers—Saudi Arabia Section , Dhahran, Riyadh, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia , Dec 1994 70. Oesterling D. , “Understanding Pressure Dew Point vs. Atmospheric Dew Point; The How of −100F...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005926
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... in steel to form carbon monoxide as follows: (Eq 7) (C) + O ⇌ CO Even a low-dew point hydrogen atmosphere has some minor decarburizing effect, particularly on high-carbon steels because of the ability of the gas, even when it is not in the nascent condition, to react with carbon: (Eq 8...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., generally below 1 4 Pa (2 × 10 −3 torr), is commonly used above 815 °C (1500 °F). It is particularly desirable when parts are at or close to final dimensions. Dry argon, with a dew point of −50 °C (−60 °F) or lower, should be used if no oxidation can be tolerated. It is mandatory...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005985
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... ). These require dew-point or infrared control so as not to carburize or decarburize the stainless grade being heat treated. Endothermic gas containing approximately 40% hydrogen can embrittle oil-quenched martensitic stainless steels. An exothermic gas ratio of 6.5 or 7 to 1 is satisfactory for grades...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004177
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
..., process liquid spillage, spray from fire sprinklers, deluge systems, washrooms, and from condensation on cold surfaces after vapor barrier damage. Second, a major corrosion problem develops in situations where there are cycling temperatures that vary from below the dew point to above ambient temperatures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005990
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
...). If an inert gas or hydrogen is used, the key consideration is moisture content. The dew point must be –40 °C (−40 °F) or lower. More stringent levels may be required if mirror finishes are desired. Cool-down must be rapid, since oxidation potential increases as temperature decreases. Vacuum or inert gas...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001453
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... the oxides of many elements. Hydrogen with a dew point of −51 °C (−60 °F) dissociates the oxides of most elements found in heat-resistant alloys, with the notable exception of aluminum and titanium, which are found in most of the high-strength heat-resistant base metals. Inert gases, such as helium...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003156
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... of 10 −4 to 10 −5 mm Hg, pure hydrogen, and partly combusted city gas dried to a dew point of 4 °C (40 °F). For the recommended temperatures in these atmospheres, see the entries for Mo, Ta, and W at the end of this table. (b) Decomposes before melting at 1740 °C (3165 °F) for MoSi 2 , and 1825 °C...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003694
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... weather conditions. This is especially important in the early morning when the weather is changing or during seasonal changes when condensation is common. The presence of a thin film of condensed moisture on the surface may be visually imperceptible, but a quick check of the dew point and the surface...