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cubic crystal systems

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005400
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... crystal structures yield stress face-centered cubic system shear stress Taylor model THE PURPOSE of this article is to enable the reader to understand through examples the fundamentals of crystal plasticity. The rich historical development of crystal plasticity is traced in some detail to enable...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0006544
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... for all-face-centered cubic, I for innercentered (body-centered) cubic, and R for primitive rhombohedral. Crystal Structure Nomenclature When the seven crystal systems are considered together with the five space lattices, the combinations listed in Table 2 are obtained. These 14 combinations...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003084
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
.... Several of the many possible crystal structures possible are so commonly found in metallic systems that they are often identified by three-letter abbreviations that combine the space lattice with crystal system. For example, bcc for body-centered cubic (two atoms per unit cell), fcc is used for face...
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 2 Orientation relation between the orthogonal sample reference directions ( X , Y , Z or rolling direction, or RD; transverse direction, or TD; and normal direction, or ND, for a sheet material) and the orthogonal crystal reference directions [100], [010], and [001] for a cubic crystal More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 8 Titanium-niobium phase diagram. This beta-stabilized system is typical of the beta-isomorphous type. Both titanium and niobium have body-centered cubic crystal structures. Source: Ref 1 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004018
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... packed (but not closely packed) planes in body-centered cubic crystals. Slip systems in face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, and hexagonal close-packed structures Table 1 Slip systems in face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, and hexagonal close-packed structures Crystal structure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001106
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... polycrystalline diamond or CBN tools. Synthesis of Diamond and Cubic Boron Nitride The basic objective in the synthesis of diamond and CBN is to transform a crystal structure from a soft hexagonal form to a hard cubic form. In the case of carbon, for example, hexagonal carbon (graphite) would...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003735
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... involved in massive transformations and illustrates the resulting phases and structures in ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys. ferrous metals massive transformation structure nonferrous metals nucleation single-crystal growth MASSIVE TRANSFORMATIONS involve a transition in crystal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 27 April 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v03.a0006221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-163-4
..., monoclinic; cc, complex cubic. Source: Ref 1 Fig. 2 Arrangement of atoms: (a) face-centered cubic (fcc), (b) hexagonal close-packed (hcp), and (c) body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structures. Source: Ref 2 Crystals have been classified into seven basic systems (see the appendix...
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 36 Structure of borides. Source: Ref 81 , 82 , 83 Formula Metal Crystal system and structural type Arrangement of boron atoms M 4 B Pd, Pt Cubic, Pt 4 B-type Isolated atoms M 2 B Ta, Cr, Mo, W, Fe, Ni, Co Tetragonal, CuAl 2 -type Isolated atoms M 5 B 3 More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001759
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... bodies exhibit some texturing; more difficult is the production of a material without texture. Preferred orientations often alter property behavior, because crystals are inherently anisotropic. For example, Young's modulus varies with direction in most crystals. In face-centered cubic (fcc) crystals...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003736
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... or heating rate is sufficiently rapid. The most common example is martensite in steel, when the more densely packed austenite (face-centered cubic, or fcc) phase transforms to the less densely packed crystal structures of either body-centered cubic (bcc) ferrite or body-centered tetragonal (bct) martensite...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 27 April 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v03.a0006229
EISBN: 978-1-62708-163-4
... decomposition results in two phases with the same crystal structure, the lattice must remain continuous. If the atomic radii of the species present in a spinodal structure vary appreciably, then coherency strains will be present. If the strain induced in the lattice is significant, the system can be stabilized...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003733
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
..., their dislocations and degrees of ordering (long and short order). It focuses on the common superlattice structures and ordered phases observed in copper-gold and iron-aluminum alloy systems. These superlattice types can be referred to by Strukturbericht symbols and the prototype phase. antiphase boundaries...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003254
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
..., a crystal lattice is formed (see Fig 2 .). Although the arrangement of atoms in space can be of fourteen different types (or Bravais lattices), most metals have face-centered cubic (fcc) (e.g., nickel, aluminum, copper, lead), body-centered cubic (bcc) (e.g., iron, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003716
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... in gases has been primarily a problem in combustion systems. Thus, the gas-metal reactions are usually referred to as oxidation in its broad chemical sense, whether the reaction is with pure oxygen, water, sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), or whatever the gas might be. The corrosion product (oxide layer) is termed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004028
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... and tensile twinning is more anisotropic than those of fcc and bcc crystals ( Fig. 2c ). While the Bishop and Hill principle removes the ambiguity in choosing the yield stress, another type of ambiguity arises when more than five planes intersect in one vertex, a usual situation in cubic systems...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005424
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... + ∑ α γ ˙ α ( T α ) The assumed slip systems for the face-centered cubic crystals, for example, are the 12 systems with (110) directions and ⟨111⟩ normals. The symmetric and skew symmetric parts of the plastic velocity gradient, d ^ ♯ ′ and w...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0005701
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
...DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0005701 Abbreviations and Symbols a wheel depth of cut in grinding; crystal CFR Code of Federal Regulations f feed rate lattice length along the a-axis CHM chemical milling ft feed per tooth CIM computer integrated manufacturing A area CL cutter location F force em...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.9781627081887
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7