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crucible furnaces

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005899
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract This article provides a detailed discussion on the components of a high-performance induction crucible furnace system, namely, furnace body, power supply, and peripheral components. The furnace body contains refractory lining, coil and transformer yokes, and tilting frame and furnace...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005198
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Abstract This article discusses the design parameters, operation, characteristics, properties, and advantages of various types of crucible furnaces, such as stationary, tilting, and movable furnaces. It also provides information on the application of the crucible furnaces. crucible...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005900
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... of VIM furnaces are in full accordance with conventional induction melting furnaces, which are described in the article “Components, Design, and Operation of Induction Crucible Furnaces” in this Volume. The most important difference is the need for high insulation capability of the induction coil...
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 17 Medium-frequency crucible furnaces for heavy metal. (a) Tilting crucible furnace with an ejectable crucible. (b) Lifting crucible furnace. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5 Stationary crucible furnaces equipped for hand-ladle dip-out pours. (a) Side flue configuration. (b) Configuration with cover plate openings on outside diameter of crucible top More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 29 Charging device for crucible furnaces: bucket charging. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 30 Charging device for crucible furnaces: quasicontinuous charging with a traveling vibration trough. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 54 Operating diagrams for a tandem with two 8 ton crucible furnaces and a 6 MW power supply. Progress over time of the (a) pouring ladle contents, (b) furnace contents (theoretic melt quantity), and (c) furnace performance. Source: Ref 38 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 55 Operating diagrams for two 6 ton crucible furnaces and a 4600 kW power supply in combination with a 10 ton pouring furnace. Progress over time of the (a) pouring furnace contents, (b) furnace contents (theoretic melt quantity), and (c) furnace performance. Source: Ref 38 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 11 Control panel for two 7.5 ton, 2.2 MW, 65 Hz induction crucible furnaces for melting aluminum scrap. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 1 Large electric bale-out crucible furnace. Courtesy of Morgan Crucible More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Crucible furnace in die casting foundry. Courtesy of Morgan Crucible More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Typical lip-axis tilting crucible furnace used for fuel-fired furnace melting of copper alloys. Similar furnaces are available that tilt on a central axis More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 10 Typical lift-out crucible furnace especially well adapted to foundry melting of small quantities of copper alloys (usually less than 135 kg, or 300 lb) More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 11 Cross section of a double push-out stationary crucible furnace More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 1 Typical lift-out type of fuel-fired crucible furnace, especially well adapted to foundry melting of smaller quantities of copper alloys (usually less than 140 kg, or 300 lb) More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 3 Typical lift-out version of a stationary crucible furnace specifically adapted to the foundry melting of small quantities (<140 kg, or 300 lb) of copper alloys More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 4 Cross section of a double pushout stationary crucible furnace More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 7 Two variations of a tilting crucible furnace. (a) Center axis. (b) Lip axis More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 10 Induction crucible furnace. (a) Cross section of key components. (b) Electromagnetic force density distribution that results in four-quadrant stirring action, which aids in producing a homogeneous melt. Courtesy of ABP Induction Systems More