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crack nucleation

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002355
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... Abstract This article presents an overview of fatigue crack nucleation from the point of view of the material microstructure and its evolution during cycling. It describes the sites of microcrack nucleation at the free surfaces. The article discusses the relation of dislocation structures...
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 18 Neumann's model of crack nucleation. In part (c), A represents a crack nucleus. Source: Ref 42 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 19 Fujita's model of crack nucleation. See text for definitions of symbols. Source: Ref 79 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 20 Oding's model of crack nucleation. b , Burgers vector. Source Ref 80 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 7 Subsurface crack nucleation at inclusion, erroneously suggesting initial fast crack growth. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 22 Fatigue crack nucleation sites in Ti-6Al-4V alpha-beta alloy. (a) Fully lamellar microstructure. (b) Fully equiaxed microstructure. (c) Duplex microstructure More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 10 Fatigue crack nucleation sites in Ti-6Al-4V. (a) Fully lamellar microstructure. (b) Fully equiaxed microstructure. (c) Duplex microstructure. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 17 Fatigue crack nucleation in conventionally aged Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 22 Fatigue crack nucleation sites in Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al. α p , primary alpha phase. Source: Ref 31 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 408 TEM p-c replica of a region centered on the crack-nucleation point visible near the right edge of the fracture surface shown in Fig. 405 . The surface is intergranular and free of corrosion products, which is consistent with fracture caused by hydrogen embrittlement. 8000× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 409 TEM p-c replica of a region containing the crack-nucleation site near point 2 in Fig. 404 . The features that are visible in this region are the same as those in the region shown in Fig. 408 , which further indicates that hydrogen embrittlement caused the cracks. 6000× More
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 44 Subsurface crack nucleation at inclusion, erroneously suggesting initial fast crack growth. Source: Ref 79 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 412 TEM p-c replica of a region containing a point of nucleation in a crack very similar to those shown in Fig. 404 and 411 , in a companion actuator shaft. This surface shows all of the intergranular characteristics of fracture by hydrogen embrittlement seen in Fig. 408 and 409 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract This article focuses on characterizing the fracture-surface appearance at the microscale and contains some discussion on both crack nucleation and propagation mechanisms that cause the fracture appearance. It begins with a discussion on microscale models and mechanisms for deformation...