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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004164
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract Advances in vehicle design and technology require engine coolant technology to minimize the degradation of nonmetals and prevent the corrosion of the metals in the cooling system. This article provides a detailed discussion on the functions, operation, materials, and major components...
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 13 Effect of coolants on power (a), G ratio (b), and surface finish (c). Material machined is M7 steel at 61 HRC, which was externally ground at V W = 15 m/min (50 sfm) using a 53A80N8V128 abrasive wheel with a speed of V S = 43 m/s (8500 sfm) and a D E of 53.3 mm (2.1 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 14 Effect of water-mixed coolants on average power (a), cumulative G ratio (b), and average surface finish (c). Material machined is 52100 bearing steel at 60 HRC that was ground with a 32A80M8VS abrasive wheel having V S of 43 m/s (8500 sfm), V W of 46 m/min (150 sfm), and D E More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 24 Solder bloom formation can block and restrict the flow of coolant in the radiator. (a) New radiator core. (b) Solder bloom after just 22,000 miles of normal highway operation. See the article “Engine Coolants and Coolant System Corrosion” in this Volume. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 25 Erosion-corrosion related to high coolant flow. (a) Radiator tank erosion on wall opposite inlet. (b) Tube narrowing causes increased velocity and turbulent flow. See the article “Engine Coolants and Coolant System Corrosion” in this Volume. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 18 (a) Corrosion potential and coolant conductivity combinations in which IGSCC is observed in sensitized type 304 stainless during an accelerated slow-strain-rate test conducted at various operating BWRs. Source: Ref 58 . (b) Observed and predicted relationships between the crack More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Reactor coolant pump closure stud degraded by exposure to borated water. Source: Ref 20 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 The effects of average plant water purity (measured by coolant conductivity) are shown in field correlations of the core component cracking behavior for (a) stainless steel (SS) intermediate range monitor/source range monitor (IRM/SRM) instrumentation dry tubes, (b) creviced stainless More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 Solder bloom formation can block and restrict the flow of coolant in the radiator. (a) New radiator core. (b) Solder bloom after just 22,000 miles of normal highway operation More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Erosion-corrosion related to high coolant flow. (a) Radiator tank erosion on wall opposite inlet. (b) Tube narrowing causes increased velocity and turbulent flow. More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 16 Effect of coolant on the flank wear of PCBN tools after 20 min of cutting. Machining parameters: cutting speed = 50 m/min (165 sfm); feed rate = 0.7 mm/rev (0.028 in./rev); depth of cut = 8 mm (0.315 in.) More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 33 Cylindrical grinding of a bar between two lathe centers. Coolant flow was reduced to aid photo focusing. More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 35 Cylindrical grinding of a crankshaft. Coolant flow was turned off to improve photo clarity and focus. More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 28 Effect of coolant on grinding performance with CBN wheels. The operation is the inside diameter grinding of M7 high-speed tool steel using a B180J100V wheel. A, 5% water-soluble oil; B, 100% oil coolant. (a) Unit-width power plotted against unit-width metal removal rate. (b) G ratio More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 37 Schematic illustrating abrasive stick dressing. Low coolant flow is required during the stick dressing process. More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 10 Recommended coolant pressures (a) and volumes (b) for multiple-cutter internal chip removal trepanning tools More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 37 Machining gray iron (a) with coolant and (b) dry machining, which produces clean, recyclable chips. Source: Ref 30 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 23 Example high-pressure coolant turning tools with integrated delivery nozzles. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 32 Loss-of-coolant accident. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 9 Flexible nozzle hoses can be used to direct coolant to the area to be cut (arrows). More