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continuous-cooling precipitation diagram

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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 28 Continuous-cooling precipitation diagrams of three 6 xxx aluminum wrought alloys. Linear cooling from solution annealing done at 540 °C (1000 °F) for 20 min. Numbers in boxes near time scale indicate total precipitation enthalpy (Δ H ) in J/g. Circled numbers indicate Vickers hardness More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 29 Continuous-cooling precipitation diagrams of wrought 6082 with low and high mass fraction of solute. Linear cooling from solution annealing done at 540 °C (1000 °F) for 20 min. Numbers in boxes near time scale indicate total precipitation enthalpy (Δ H ) in J/g. Circled numbers More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 30 Continuous-cooling precipitation diagrams of Al-Si-Mg cast alloy. Linear cooling from solution annealing done at 540 °C (1000 °F) for 480 min. Numbers in boxes near time scale indicate total precipitation enthalpy (Δ H ) in J/g. Circled numbers indicate Vickers hardness (HV1) after More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 31 Continuous-cooling precipitation diagrams of 7020 and 7150 wrought alloys. Linear cooling from solution annealing was done at 480 °C (900 °F) (30 min for 7020; 60 min for 7150). Numbers in boxes near time scale indicate total precipitation enthalpy (Δ H ) in J/g. Circled numbers More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 32 Continuous-cooling precipitation diagrams of 7075 and 7049A wrought alloys with linear cooling from solution annealing. Numbers in boxes near time scale indicate total precipitation enthalpy (Δ H ) in J/g. Circled numbers indicate Vickers hardness (HV5) after aging. Heat treatment More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 33 Continuous-cooling precipitation diagrams of two 2 xxx wrought alloys with linear cooling from solution annealing. Numbers in boxes near time scale indicate total precipitation enthalpy (Δ H ) in J/g. Circled numbers indicate Vickers hardness (HV1) after aging. Heat treatment of 2024 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006272
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Abstract This article discusses the various methods for evaluating the quench sensitivity of aluminum alloys, namely, time-temperature-property diagrams, the quench factor analysis, the Jominy end-quench method, and continuous-cooling precipitation diagrams. It briefly describes the procedures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006271
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... aluminum alloys ( Ref 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 ). However, reliable TTT and time-temperature-precipitation (TTP) diagrams are still missing for many aluminum alloys. Available continuous cooling precipitation (CCP) diagrams are presented in the article “Quench Sensitivity of Aluminum Alloys” in this Volume...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005962
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... ferrite. Stabilizing the austenite phase hinders the formation of copper precipitates during continuous cooling after solutionizing. Consequently, a greater quantity of copper remains in a supersaturated solid solution at the beginning of isothermal aging. Chromium Chromium induces the formation...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 27 April 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v03.a0006225
EISBN: 978-1-62708-163-4
...: coring segregation is eliminated by a of the components, and the θ phase is dissolved in the α phase. When the alloy is slowly cooled from 510 °C, it starts rejecting or precipitating θ when it reaches the solvus temperature at 480 °C. Fig. 23 Aluminum-copper phase diagram and the microstructures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003723
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... the use of equilibrium binary phase diagrams as a tool in the interpretation of microstructures. It reviews an account of the two types of solid-state phase transformations: isothermal and athermal. The article discusses isothermal transformation and continuous cooling transformation diagrams which...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001022
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... steels in forgings with cross sections up to at least 75 mm (3 in.) thick. It should be noted that a reduction in forging temperature would result in improved toughness in these steels. Figure 6 shows the continuous cooling transformation diagram for the 1524MoV steel. Fig. 5 Effect of cooling...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003731
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Abstract Precipitation reactions occur in many different alloy systems when one phase transforms into a mixed-phase system as a result of cooling from high temperatures. This article discusses the homogenous and heterogeneous nucleation and growth of coherent and semicoherent precipitates...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 27 April 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v03.a0006226
EISBN: 978-1-62708-163-4
... and the extension of the β phase region in the phase diagram. If the diffusion rate is small, the peritectic transformation will be negligible compared to the peritectic reaction. During continuous cooling, this diffusional growth is affected by precipitation from the liquid and from the primary α or by dissolution...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005613
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... the microstructural development under nonequilibrium conditions in steels, a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram ( Fig. 2 ) is a convenient method. However, a conventional CCT diagram like the one shown in Fig. 2 cannot be used to accurately describe the transformation behavior in a weldment of the same...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... the two-phase field and the solid field is the solidus. In general, a liquidus is the locus of points in a phase diagram representing the temperatures at which alloys of the various compositions of the system begin to freeze on cooling or finish melting on heating; a solidus is the locus of points...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4F
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 February 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04F.a0006995
EISBN: 978-1-62708-450-5
... austenitization, isothermally held at 343 °C (650 °F) for 20 min to partially transform the austenite, then water quenched (untransformed austenite forms martensite). Courtesy of George F. Vander Voort, Vander Voort Consulting Time-Temperature-Transformation and Continuous-Cooling Transformation Diagrams...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001008
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... of various diameters, cooled at various rates, can be estimated. Continuous cooling diagrams, in which cooling conditions that produce various microstructures are defined for a given steel, are often related to hardness gradients measured on Jominy end-quenched specimens, as shown in Fig. 18 . Fig. 18...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005214
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... will be negligible compared to the peritectic reaction. During continuous cooling, this diffusion-controlled growth is affected by precipitation from the liquid and from the primary α or by dissolution of β, according to the slopes of the solubility limits in the phase diagram. Under simplifying conditions...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001341
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... is by a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram ( Fig. 1 ). However, a conventional CCT diagram such as the one shown in Fig. 1 cannot be used to accurately describe the transformation behavior in a weldment of the same material because weld thermal cycles are very different from those used for generating...