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computational fluid dynamics

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005426
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Abstract Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a computationally intensive three-dimensional simulation of thermal fluids systems where non-linear momentum transport plays an important role. This article presents the governing equations of fluid dynamics and an introduction to the CFD...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002444
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... Abstract Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is reserved for computationally intensive three-dimensional simulations of thermal fluids systems where nonlinear momentum transport plays an important role. This article presents the governing equations of fluid dynamics and an introduction...
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 35 Computational domain of the computational fluid dynamics model, and the resultant flows through diagonal slices though the work zone More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 11 (a) Computational domain used for computational fluid dynamics evaluation. (b) Diagonal cuts through the rack showing the agitators and the pinions. (c) Variation of flow magnitudes around the pinions in the rack. Source: Ref 278 . Copyright Carl Hanser Verlag, Munich; used More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 28 Entire computational domain used for the computational fluid dynamics model of the quench tank and pinions More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 101 Computational domain of the computational fluid dynamics model and the resultant flows through diagonal slices of the work zone More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 28 Resultant flow fields of computational fluid dynamics model of Case History 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 1 Examples of grids used in computational fluid dynamics calculations. Two-dimensional examples are shown for clarity. (a) Structured grid. (b) Block-structured grid. (c) Unstructured hexahedral (quadrilateral) grid. (d) Unstructured tetrahedral (triangular) grid. (e) Local mesh More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Principal cell or element types for computational fluid dynamics. (a) Tetrahedron: four vertices or nodes, four faces, and six edges for each element. (b) Hexahedron: eight vertices or nodes, six faces, and twelve edges for each element. (c) Sampling of possible edge and/or face More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 15 Streamline flow field from two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model representing material flow around a tool pin. Tool rotation is counterclockwise, and the tool moves from left to right. Source: Ref 31 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 2 Ocean surface temperatures from a recent computational fluid dynamics simulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 3 Examples of grids used in computational fluid dynamics calculations. Two-dimensional examples are shown for clarity. (a) Structured grid. (b) Block-structured grid. (c) Unstructured hexahedral (quadrilateral) grid. (d) Unstructured tetrahedral (triangular) grid. (e) Local mesh More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 4 Principal cell or element types for computational fluid dynamics. (a) Tetrahedron: there are four vertices or nodes, four faces, and six edges for each element. (b) Hexahedron: there are eight vertices or nodes, six faces, and twelve edges for each element. Hexahedral elements generally More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 6 The computational fluid dynamics process. More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 26 Heat-transfer coefficients determined using computational fluid dynamics for a large ring gear that was gas quenched More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 12 (a) Two-dimensional mesh for computational fluid dynamics analysis for friction stir welding. (b) Mesh details near pin tool More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 28 Mesh used for disk and quench tank in computational fluid dynamics study. Source: Ref 73 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 8 Computational fluid dynamics model of pressure versus gap height. Smaller gaps entail higher pressure. (a) Small gap, (b) moderate gap, (c) large gap More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 5 Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the powder-bed fusion process. Source: Ref 29 More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 33 Computational fluid dynamics flow field at 500 rpm of J-tube, showing uniform velocity along the length of the longer leg More