1-20 of 193 Search Results for

coefficients of friction

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006791
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract Friction and wear are important when considering the operation and efficiency of components and mechanical systems. Among the different types and mechanisms of wear, adhesive wear is very serious. Adhesion results in a high coefficient of friction as well as in serious damage to the...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003030
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... in a computerized database. ASTM G 115-93, “Standard Guide for Measuring and Reporting Friction Coefficients” ( Ref 17 ), tabulates current ASTM friction tests standards, points out the factors that must be considered when determining coefficients of friction, and suggests a standard reporting format...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005678
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... hip and the knee, operate with average coefficients of friction of about 0.02 and wear factors of about 10 −6 mm 3 /N · m. Like many bearings, they tend to deteriorate with time, and in due course the bearing material roughens, fissures, and wears away to expose the underlying bone. This process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005677
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... follows an exponential function, whereas the tangential force (friction) increases linearly with normal load ( Ref 41 ). The coefficient of friction is not a perfect indicator of wear. The track width data indicate that the principal mechanisms for the accommodation of strain are elastic deformation and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005417
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... dynamic response of equipment. The article reviews the determination of friction coefficient using laboratory monitoring methods, indirect measurements, and the inverse method. It considers the determination of the interface heat-transfer coefficient by using the ring test and computer simulations. The...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005668
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... discusses various in vivo environmental conditions in tribological tests. Some typical examples of biomaterials testing are also provided. biomaterials electrical contact resistance friction coefficient linear reciprocating motion orthopaedic coatings pin-on-disk method tribocorrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009008
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... approximating the strain paths as second order equations, the coefficients of the linear and quadratic terms are correlated statistically to the specimen aspect ratio (H/D) and friction. In addition, finite element analyses of the upsetting process (e.g., Ref 14 ) have been performed to determine the strain...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003021
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
.... Frictional heating is important in the ultrasonic, vibration, and spin welding methods. In ultrasonic welding, heat generation depends on the storage and loss moduli of the polymer. In the cases of vibration and spin welding, heat generation depends on the frictional coefficient of the polymer material and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... − exp ( − h T t c ρ h a ) ] where σ a is the measured average stress, h a is the average height of the specimen, h T is the heat-transfer coefficient between the platen and the specimen, m is the friction factor between the platen and the specimen, t is the time...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... material, σ 0 : (Eq 11) p ¯ σ 0 = ( h 4 μ a ) 2 ( e 2 μ a / h − 2 μ a h − 1 ) where a is the radius of the cylinder, and μ is the Coulomb coefficient of friction. The true compressive strain, ε, is given by: (Eq 12) ε = ln...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005430
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... 10 −9 … 10 −15 to 10 −11 Conductivity (ionic crystals) … 10 −17 to 10 −10 Resistivity (semiconductors) … 10 −20 to 10 −12 Elastic after-effect … 10 −25 to 10 −21 Internal friction … 10 −20 to 10 −15 Magnetic anisotropy … 10 −25 to 10 −21 Source: Ref 5...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
.... Other important applications for copper and copper-base P/M materials include friction materials, brushes, filters, structural parts, electrical parts, additives to iron powders (alloying as well as infiltration), catalysts, paints, and pigments. In general, physical and mechanical properties of...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... friction. The two most common methods of measuring specific heat are differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Figure 4 shows a DTA cell in which a specimen and a reference are heated by a single heating element while each temperature is monitored. These...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... temperature changes with local heating by deformation and friction. The two most common methods of measuring specific heat are differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Figure 14 shows a DTA cell, in which a specimen (S) and a reference (R) are heated by a single...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005459
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... ). Any significant deviation from these expressions should trigger more detailed analysis of measurement techniques and analysis (e.g., accounting for friction, deformation heating, a delay between the end of deformation and the actual quench of samples) ( Ref 14 ) before investigating an atypical...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005234
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... retarded by this friction, even at very small amounts of solid, there is still enough potential for the flow to cause the exchange of fluid between the mushy zone and the melt pool. Closer to the solidus, where the dendrites are much more interconnected, the surface area/volume ratio is a less important...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005339
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... higher than that of the unreinforced-matrix alloys. Hardness increases with increasing volume fraction of reinforcement and is affected by processing variables. Also, the addition of ceramic phase in metallic matrices improves the friction and wear behavior. Figure 17 shows the wear resistance of A356...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003091
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... carbon monoxide partial pressure in the hearth zone, an increase in temperature helps increase the partitioning of manganese, silicon, and sulfur. The activity of various oxides in the slag and the activity coefficient of different solutes in molten iron are important factors in determining the...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... ). The four parameters that control the magnitude of P ex are die angle, reduction of area (extrusion ratio), coefficient of friction, and yield strength of the billet material. There are three types of work incorporated into extrusion pressure: work of homogenous deformation, or the minimum work...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004017
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... modeling of the hot compression test using realistic parameters for hot-worked alloys showed that an observed barreling coefficient can be used to determine the friction factor for use in Eq 14 ( Ref 6 ). The barreling coefficient is defined as: (Eq 15) B = h ( r max ) 2 h...