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cleavage fracture

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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 13 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron showing a tilt boundary, cleavage steps, and river patterns. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) p-c replica. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 13 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron showing a tilt boundary, cleavage steps, and river patterns. TEM p-c replica More
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Published: 30 January 2024
Fig. 12 Cleavage fracture surface. (a) This brittle overload fracture is highly reflective due to the random orientation of cleavage facets that reflect direct light into the camera lens. This causes the fracture to “sparkle.” (b) Higher-magnification example of a brittle overload fracture More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 9 Scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) image of transgranular cleavage fracture in Ta-10W spallation sample. Source: Ref 84 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 29 Cleavage fracture in a quenched-and-tempered low-carbon steel examined using three direct methods and three replication methods. (a) Light microscopy (LM) cross section (nickel plated). Etched with Vilella's reagent. (b) LM fractograph (direct). (c) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 15 Cleavage fracture in a notched impact specimen of hot-rolled 1040 steel broken at −196 °C (−321 °F), shown at three magnifications. The specimen was tilted in the scanning electron microscope at an angle of 40° to the electron beam. The cleavage planes followed by the crack show More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 10 Schematic of cleavage fracture formation showing the effect of subgrain boundaries. (a) Tilt boundary. (b) Twist boundary. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 11 Schematic of cleavage fracture formation showing the effect of subgrain boundaries. (a) Tilt boundary. (b) Twist boundary More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 44 Quasi-cleavage fracture in a hydrogen-embrittled AISI 4340 steel heat treated to an ultimate tensile strength of 2082 MPa (302 ksi). Source: Ref 138 More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 45 Examples of hydrogen-embrittled steels. (a) Cleavage fracture in a hydrogen-embrittled annealed type 301 austenitic stainless steel. Source: Ref 98 . (b) intergranular decohesive fracture in an AISI 4130 steel heat treated to an ultimate tensile strength of 1281 MPa (186 ksi More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 60 Cleavage fracture resulting from exposure of a 7075-T6 aluminum alloy to mercury vapor during a slow-bend fracture toughness test. Both (a) and (b), which is at a higher magnification, clearly show cleavage facets and secondary cracking. More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 13 Cleavage fracture in a notched impact specimen of hot-rolled 1040 steel broken at −196 °C (−320 °F), shown at three magnifications. The specimen was tilted at an angle of 40 ° to the electron beam. The cleavage planes followed by the crack show various alignments, as influenced More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 25 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron broken at dry-ice temperature (−78.5 °C, or −109.3 °F). The light band shows where cleavage followed a twin-matrix interface. The black meandering line is a shear step through the thickness of the twin. TEM p-c replica, 3000× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 26 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron broken at dry-ice temperature (−78.5 °C, or −109.3 °F), showing facets of which most have the same orientation. Facets that depart from the general orientation appear lighter or darker than the majority. TEM direct carbon replica, 3000× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 27 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron broken at −45 °C (−49 °F). Instead of cleavage steps, tear ridges (occasionally forming river patterns) were produced here by microscopic plastic flow. TEM p-c replica, 2000× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 28 Cleavage fracture in Armco iron broken at −196 °C (−321 °F), showing river patterns, tongues, and (from bottom right to top left) a grain boundary. TEM p-c replica, 3000× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 97 Brittle cleavage fracture in ferritic ductile iron. SEM, 1000× (W.L. Bradley, Texas A&M University) More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 163 Fractograph of cleavage fracture in low-carbon steel shows tongue (arrow) formed by local fracture along twin-matrix interfaces. Tongue formation occurs as a result of the high velocity at which a cleavage crack propagates (it has limiting velocity between 0.4 and 0.5 of the speed More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 164 River pattern on cleavage fracture surface of low-carbon steel bolt. When a crack crosses a twist boundary, many small parallel cracks may form with cleavage steps between them. These steps run together, forming larger ones and leading to the river patterns characteristic of cleavage More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 1180 Cleavage fracture in a specimen of titanium alloy Ti-7Al-2Nb-1Ta, produced by stress-corrosion cracking in methanol. Note the regular array of fissures, which are parallel to the crack front. See also Fig. 1181 . TEM p-c replica, 2000× More